A multi-component social skills intervention for children with Asperger syndrome: The junior detective training program

Beaumont, Renae and Sofronoff, Kate (2008) A multi-component social skills intervention for children with Asperger syndrome: The junior detective training program. The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49 7: 743-753. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01920.x


Author Beaumont, Renae
Sofronoff, Kate
Title A multi-component social skills intervention for children with Asperger syndrome: The junior detective training program
Journal name The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9630
1469-7610
Publication date 2008-07-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01920.x
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 7
Start page 743
End page 753
Total pages 11
Editor Frank C. Verhulst
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920410 Mental Health
Formatted abstract
Background: The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a new multi-component social skills intervention for children with Asperger syndrome (AS): The Junior Detective Training Program. This 7-week program included a computer game, small group sessions, parent training sessions and teacher handouts.

Method: Forty-nine children with AS were recruited to participate and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 26) or wait-list control (n = 23) conditions.

Results: Relative to children in the wait-list group, program participants showed greater improvements in social skills over the course of the intervention, as indicated by parent-report measures. Teacher-report data also confirmed that children receiving the intervention made significant improvements in social functioning from pre- to post-treatment. Treatment group participants were better able to suggest appropriate emotion-management strategies for story characters at post-intervention than at pre-intervention, whereas control participants were not. However, there was no difference in the improvements made by children in the intervention and control conditions on facial expression and body-posture recognition measures. Follow-up data suggested that treatment gains were maintained by children at 5-months post-intervention.

Conclusions: The Junior Detective Training Program appeared to be effective in enhancing the social skills and emotional understanding of children with AS. Limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Keyword Asperger syndrome
social skills
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 00:24:44 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology