"Move over and make room for Meeka": The representation of race, otherness and indigeneity on the Australian children's television programme Play School

Mackinlay, Elizabeth and Barney, Katelyn (2008) "Move over and make room for Meeka": The representation of race, otherness and indigeneity on the Australian children's television programme Play School. Discourse, 29 2: 273-288. doi:10.1080/01596300801967011

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Author Mackinlay, Elizabeth
Barney, Katelyn
Title "Move over and make room for Meeka": The representation of race, otherness and indigeneity on the Australian children's television programme Play School
Journal name Discourse   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0159-6306
1469-3739
Publication date 2008-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01596300801967011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 2
Start page 273
End page 288
Total pages 16
Editor Robert Lingard
Victoria Maree Carrington
Martin D. Mills
Place of publication Oxon, United
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject C1
970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
970101 Expanding Knowledge in the Mathematical Sciences
130101 Continuing and Community Education
190409 Musicology and Ethnomusicology
130102 Early Childhood Education (excl. Maori)
Abstract Play school is an icon of Australian children's television and an important part of Australian life - this programme, perhaps more than any other, has taken and continues to take centre stage in our living rooms and social worlds as young children. Play school is invested with an enormous amount of cultural capital and hence plays a significant role in the way that children engage and learn about social interaction, life and values in Australian culture. Aimed at preschoolers under the age of five, everything in the programme is done to relate as closely as possible to the social world and developmental level of the child and thereby assist their social, psychological and cognitive development. Through a combination of songs and dances, stories, dress up games and moments to 'look through the window' into the real world outside Play school, children are presented with a variety of sounds and images to engage with social concepts. In this paper we explore discourses of race, otherness and Indigeneity on Play school by deconstructing Aboriginalist images and representations featured on the programme and in doing so ask questions about the types of 'race making' that this programme engages in.
Formatted abstract
Play school is an icon of Australian children's television and an important part of Australian life – this programme, perhaps more than any other, has taken and continues to take centre stage in our living rooms and social worlds as young children. Play school is invested with an enormous amount of cultural capital and hence plays a significant role in the way that children engage and learn about social interaction, life and values in Australian culture. Aimed at preschoolers under the age of five, everything in the programme is done to relate as closely as possible to the social world and developmental level of the child and thereby assist their social, psychological and cognitive development. Through a combination of songs and dances, stories, dress up games and moments to ‘look through the window’ into the real world outside Play school, children are presented with a variety of sounds and images to engage with social concepts. In this paper we explore discourses of race, otherness and Indigeneity on Play school by deconstructing Aboriginalist images and representations featured on the programme and in doing so ask questions about the types of ‘race making’ that this programme engages in.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 19:16:26 EST by Nicola De Silva on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit