In situ photobiology of corals over large depth ranges: A multivariate analysis on the roles of environment, host, and algal symbiont

Frade, P. R., Bongaerts, P., Winkelhagen, A. J. S., Tonk, L. and Bak, R. P. M. (2008) In situ photobiology of corals over large depth ranges: A multivariate analysis on the roles of environment, host, and algal symbiont. Limnology and Oceanography, 53 6: 2711-2723. doi:10.4319/lo.2008.53.6.2711

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Author Frade, P. R.
Bongaerts, P.
Winkelhagen, A. J. S.
Tonk, L.
Bak, R. P. M.
Title In situ photobiology of corals over large depth ranges: A multivariate analysis on the roles of environment, host, and algal symbiont
Journal name Limnology and Oceanography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0024-3590
1939-5590
Publication date 2008-11-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4319/lo.2008.53.6.2711
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 53
Issue 6
Start page 2711
End page 2723
Total pages 13
Place of publication Waco, TX, United States
Publisher American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Language eng
Subject C1
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Abstract We applied a multivariate analysis to investigate the roles of host and symbiont on the in situ physiological response of genus Madracis holobionts towards light. Across a large depth gradient (5–40 m) and for four Madracis species and three symbiont genotypes, we assessed several variables by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic pigment composition, or symbiont population descriptors. Most of the variation is explained by two major photobiological components: light-use efficiency and symbiont cell densities. Two other minor components emphasize photoprotective pathways and light-harvesting properties such as secondary pigments. Statistics highlight the role of irradiance on coral physiology and reveal mechanisms that are either genetically constrained, such as symbiont cell sizes, or environmentally dependent, such as photochemical efficiencies. Other parameters, such as cellular light-harvesting and photoprotective pigment concentrations, are regulated by host, symbiont, and environment. The interaction between host and environment stresses the role of host properties in adjusting the internal environment available for the endosymbionts. Different holobiont strategies, relating to symbiont cell density, vary in their physiological optimization of light-harvesting or photoprotective mechanisms and link to host-species distribution and dominance over the reef slope. Symbiont functional diversity appears to have a significant role but does not explain host vertical distribution patterns per se, highlighting the importance of species-specific morphological and physiological properties of the coral host.
Keyword Madracis holobionts
Light-harvesting
Coral physiology
Physiological response
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 04:53:46 EST by Peter Fogarty on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies