Can music preference indicate mental health status in young people?

Baker, Felicity and Bor, William (2008) Can music preference indicate mental health status in young people?. Australasian Psychiatry, 16 4: 284-288. doi:10.1080/10398560701879589


Author Baker, Felicity
Bor, William
Title Can music preference indicate mental health status in young people?
Journal name Australasian Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1039-8562
1440-1665
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10398560701879589
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 16
Issue 4
Start page 284
End page 288
Total pages 4
Place of publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Subject 190408 Music Therapy
C1
920501 Child Health
Abstract Objective: In the aftermath of the double suicide of two teenage girls in 2007, the media linked the themes of 'emo' music and the girls' mental state. But it is not just emo music that has been the subject of scrutiny by the media. Rap music, country, and heavy metal have also been blamed for antisocial behaviours including violence, theft, promiscuity and drug use. It remains an important research and clinical question as to whether music contributes to the acting out of behaviours described in the music lyrics or whether the preferred music represents the already existing behavioural tendencies in the subject. This paper surveys and discusses the relevant literature on music preference and adolescent music listening behaviours, and their links with adolescent mental health. Conclusion: Studies have found a relationship between various genres of music and antisocial behaviours, vulnerability to suicide, and drug use. However, studies reject that music is a causal factor and suggest that music preference is more indicative of emotional vulnerability. A limited number of studies have found correlations between music preference and mental health status. More research is needed to determine whether music preferences of those with diagnosed mental health issues differ substantially from the general adolescent population.
Formatted abstract
 Objective: In the aftermath of the double suicide of two teenage girls in 2007, the media linked the themes of ‘emo’ music and the girls’ mental state. But it is not just emo music that has been the subject of scrutiny by the media. Rap music, country, and heavy metal have also been blamed for antisocial behaviours including violence, theft, promiscuity and drug use. It remains an important research and clinical question as to whether music contributes to the acting out of behaviours described in the music lyrics or whether the preferred music represents the already existing behavioural tendencies in the subject. This paper surveys and discusses the relevant literature on music preference and adolescent music listening behaviours, and their links with adolescent mental health.

Conclusion: Studies have found a relationship between various genres of music and antisocial behaviours, vulnerability to suicide, and drug use. However, studies reject that music is a causal factor and suggest that music preference is more indicative of emotional vulnerability. A limited number of studies have found correlations between music preference and mental health status. More research is needed to determine whether music preferences of those with diagnosed mental health issues differ substantially from the general adolescent population.

Keyword Adolescence
behaviour
diagnosis
mental state
music preference
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Music Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 02:44:57 EST by Mrs Gaylene Wagner on behalf of School of Music