Reducing contrast makes speeds in a video-based driving simulator harder to discriminate as well as making them appear slower

Horswill, Mark S. and Plooy, Annaliese M. (2008) Reducing contrast makes speeds in a video-based driving simulator harder to discriminate as well as making them appear slower. Perception, 37 8: 1269-1275. doi:10.1068/p5821


Author Horswill, Mark S.
Plooy, Annaliese M.
Title Reducing contrast makes speeds in a video-based driving simulator harder to discriminate as well as making them appear slower
Journal name Perception   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-0066
1468-4233
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1068/p5821
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 37
Issue 8
Start page 1269
End page 1275
Total pages 7
Editor Richard L. Gregory
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
2809 Sensory Systems
1702 Artificial Intelligence
Abstract We investigated the effect of reducing image contrast on speed perception using a video-based driving simulator in which participants viewed pairs of scenes and were asked to judge whether the second scene was faster or slower than the first scene. We predicted two outcomes: (i) that vehicle speeds would become harder to discriminate, and (ii) that vehicle speeds would appear slower. There is previous evidence confirming the latter prediction in a less realistic computer-based driving simulation, but none demonstrating the former. Our results supported both predictions, each of which may have traffic-safety implications when reduced-contrast conditions are experienced in real life, such as with fog or when the driver has cataracts.
Formatted abstract
We investigated the effect of reducing image contrast on speed perception using a video-based driving simulator in which participants viewed pairs of scenes and were asked to judge whether the second scene was faster or slower than the first scene. We predicted two outcomes: (i) that vehicle speeds would become harder to discriminate, and (ii) that vehicle speeds would appear slower. There is previous evidence confirming the latter prediction in a less realistic computer-based driving simulation, but none demonstrating the former. Our results supported both predictions, each of which may have traffic-safety implications when reduced-contrast conditions are experienced in real life, such as with fog or when the driver has cataracts.
Keyword PERCEIVED SPEED
PSYCHOMETRIC FUNCTION
CRASH INVOLVEMENT
MOTION PERCEPTION
OLDER DRIVERS
RISK
CATARACT
VELOCITY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes published online 4 August 2008

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 02:12:31 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology