Sound, chemical, and light detection in sea turtles and pelagic fishes: sensory-based approaches to bycatch redution in longline fisheries

Southwood, Amanda, Fritsches, Kerstin, Brill, Richard and Swimmer, Yonat (2008) Sound, chemical, and light detection in sea turtles and pelagic fishes: sensory-based approaches to bycatch redution in longline fisheries. Endangered Species Research, 5 2-3: 225-238. doi:10.3354/esr00097


Author Southwood, Amanda
Fritsches, Kerstin
Brill, Richard
Swimmer, Yonat
Title Sound, chemical, and light detection in sea turtles and pelagic fishes: sensory-based approaches to bycatch redution in longline fisheries
Journal name Endangered Species Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Publication date 2008-05-30
Year available 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3354/esr00097
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 2-3
Start page 225
End page 238
Total pages 14
Editor C. Lehane
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-research
Language eng
Abstract Mortality due to capture in longline fisheries has been implicated as a significant factor contributing to population declines for several species of threatened or endangered sea turtles. Identification of methods to reduce or prevent sea turtle bycatch is a high priority for fisheries managers and a necessary component of conservation efforts. One approach to reducing sea turtle interactions with longline fisheries is to take into account the behavior of sea turtles and the factors that lead them to interact with fishing gear. An understanding of the sensory cues that attract sea turtles to longline gear could help guide efforts to develop gear and bait that is less attractive, non-detectable, or even repellent to sea turtles. This paper presents a review of morphological, physiological, and behavioral studies conducted to assess the auditory, chemosensory, and visual capabilities of sea turtles, as well as the large pelagic fishes that are targeted by longline fisheries. We discuss the potential for exploiting differences in the sensory biology of these evolutionarily distinct groups to refine longline fishing techniques and reduce incidental bycatch of sea turtles without impacting the catch rates of targeted fish species. Based on the current evidence, differences in visual capabilities of sea turtles and pelagic fishes provide a promising avenue for development of a sensory-based deterrent.
Keyword Endangered species
Conservation
Chemoreception
Hearing
Vision
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2009, 01:03:07 EST by Shirley Rey on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences