South African adolescents’ career development through the lens of the Systems Theory Framework: An exploratory study

McMahon, M., Watson, M., Foxcroft, C. and Dullabh, A. (2008) South African adolescents’ career development through the lens of the Systems Theory Framework: An exploratory study. Journal of Psychology in Africa, 18 4: 531-538. doi:10.1080/14330237.2008.10820232


Author McMahon, M.
Watson, M.
Foxcroft, C.
Dullabh, A.
Title South African adolescents’ career development through the lens of the Systems Theory Framework: An exploratory study
Journal name Journal of Psychology in Africa   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1433-0237
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14330237.2008.10820232
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 531
End page 538
Total pages 8
Editor Mpofu, E.
Place of publication South Africa
Publisher National Inquiry Services Centre
Language eng
Subject C1
130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
Abstract Adolescent career development has predominantly been studied in the context of middle class Eurocentric cultures and there have been calls for greater attention to the career development of non-dominant and disadvantaged groups. Further, there have been calls to explore career development in terms of its context and process. In this regard, the need for research measures and approaches sensitive to adolescents and particular cultures has been recognised. This is particularly the case in South African career psychology. The present study used a qualitative career assessment instrument, My System of Career Influences, to explore influences on the career development of disadvantaged South African adolescents living in a children's home. Consistent with previous international and national studies, parents were shown to be an important influence. Unlike previous studies, the influence of working overseas was also identified as an important influence. The MSCI was shown to be effective in providing insight into both the context and process of career development and as a research instrument that may be used with adolescents. Recommendations for future research are made.
Keyword Adolescence
Career development
My System of Career Influences
Systems Theory Framework
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Apr 2009, 22:49:25 EST by Rebecca Donohoe on behalf of School of Education