Can music therapy engage patients in group cognitive behaviour therapy for substance abuse treatment?

Dingle, Genevieve A., Gleadhill, Libby and Baker, Felicity A. (2008) Can music therapy engage patients in group cognitive behaviour therapy for substance abuse treatment?. Drug and Alcohol Review, 27 2: 190-196. doi:10.1080/09595230701829371


Author Dingle, Genevieve A.
Gleadhill, Libby
Baker, Felicity A.
Title Can music therapy engage patients in group cognitive behaviour therapy for substance abuse treatment?
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0959-5236
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09595230701829371
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 27
Issue 2
Start page 190
End page 196
Total pages 7
Editor Saunders, John
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920414 Substance Abuse
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
1701 Psychology
Abstract Introduction and Aims. Despite the availability of effective treatments for substance use disorders, engaging people in treatment remains a challenge. This clinical study describes a 7-week trial of music therapy as an adjunct to group cognitive behaviour therapy with the aim of increasing patient engagement in a private hospital open group programme. Design and Methods. Patient attendance rates and perceptions of the music therapy were collected at the end of each music therapy session by means of an anonymous survey, and only data from each patient's first survey were used in the analysis. Twenty-four surveys were analysed, representing feedback from 10 men and 14 women, aged between 17 and 52 years. Results. The average attendance rate over the 7-week trial was 75%. The results indicated that enjoyment and motivation to participate during the sessions was uniformly high (mean ratings of 4.3 and 4.0 out of 5, respectively). The majority (83%) of participants reported that they would attend another music therapy session, and almost half (46%) endorsed that '(music therapy) would help them to feel more a part of the group'. Additional analyses revealed that music therapy was able to engage patients regardless of their age group (25 years and under vs. over-25 years) or substance (alcohol only vs. other drugs). Discussion and Conclusions. Music therapy is a promising approach to improving engagement in substance abuse treatment groups.
Formatted abstract
 Introduction and Aims. Despite the availability of effective treatments for substance use disorders, engaging people in treatment remains a challenge. This clinical study describes a 7-week trial of music therapy as an adjunct to group cognitive behaviour therapy with the aim of increasing patient engagement in a private hospital open group programme. Design and Methods. Patient attendance rates and perceptions of the music therapy were collected at the end of each music therapy session by means of an anonymous survey, and only data from each patient's first survey were used in the analysis. Twenty-four surveys were analysed, representing feedback from 10 men and 14 women, aged between 17 and 52 years. Results. The average attendance rate over the 7-week trial was 75%. The results indicated that enjoyment and motivation to participate during the sessions was uniformly high (mean ratings of 4.3 and 4.0 out of 5, respectively). The majority (83%) of participants reported that they would attend another music therapy session, and almost half (46%) endorsed that ‘(music therapy) would help them to feel more a part of the group’. Additional analyses revealed that music therapy was able to engage patients regardless of their age group (25 years and under vs. over-25 years) or substance (alcohol only vs. other drugs). Discussion and Conclusions. Music therapy is a promising approach to improving engagement in substance abuse treatment groups. [Dingle GA, Gleadhill L, Baker FA. Can music therapy engage patients in group cognitive behaviour therapy for substance abuse treatment? Drug Alcohol Rev 2008;27:190–196]
Keyword Engagement
Group cognitive behaviour therapy
Music therapy
Substance abuse treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Alternate Edition ISSN: 1465-3362.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Music Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 32 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 45 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 14 Apr 2009, 22:04:13 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences