Identification of dust transport pathways from Lake Eyre, Australia using Hysplit

McGowan, Hamish A. and Clark, Andrew (2008) Identification of dust transport pathways from Lake Eyre, Australia using Hysplit. Atmospheric Environment, 42 29: 6915-6925. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.05.053


Author McGowan, Hamish A.
Clark, Andrew
Title Identification of dust transport pathways from Lake Eyre, Australia using Hysplit
Journal name Atmospheric Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1352-2310
Publication date 2008-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.05.053
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 42
Issue 29
Start page 6915
End page 6925
Total pages 11
Editor H. B. Singh
P. Brimblecombe
Place of publication Oxford , UK
Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science
Language eng
Subject 0503 Soil Sciences
Abstract The HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT_4) is used to create seasonal climatologies (1980-2000) of air parcel trajectories from the Southern Hemisphere's most active dust source Lake Eyre, Australia. Daily trajectories were computed forward for eight days from an origin centered over Lake Eyre at 500 m above the ground surface. Trajectory density maps were then created within a GIS for five levels; 0-500 m agl., 500-1000 m agl., 1000-1500 m agl., 1500-2000 m agl. and 2000-5000 m agl. These show that air parcel trajectories originating from Lake Eyre can affect regions many thousands of kilometers from the Australian continent in a relatively short period of time. Importantly, under favourable atmospheric conditions these air parcels have the potential to transport dust and other aerosols. During the austral winter, trajectories extended north to the southern Philippines highlighting the potential for dust from central Australia to affect most of Indonesia. This includes the tropical rainforests of Borneo and New Guinea, and the coral reefs of northern Australia and the Indonesian archipelago. We also show the potential for transport of dust from Lake Eyre to the Antarctic and much of the South Pacific and Southern Oceans. Accordingly, dust from Lake Eyre may affect biogeochemical cycles, sediment budgets, atmospheric processes and a wide range of ecosystems over a region much larger than previously thought. This highlights the need for further research to confirm the deposition of dust in the areas mapped by the present study.
Formatted abstract
The HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT_4) is used to create seasonal climatologies (1980–2000) of air parcel trajectories from the Southern Hemisphere's most active dust source Lake Eyre, Australia.

Daily trajectories were computed forward for eight days from an origin centered over Lake Eyre at 500 m above the ground surface. Trajectory density maps were then created within a GIS for five levels; 0–500 m agl., 500–1000 m agl., 1000–1500 m agl., 1500–2000 m agl. and 2000–5000 m agl. These show that air parcel trajectories originating from Lake Eyre can affect regions many thousands of kilometers from the Australian continent in a relatively short period of time. Importantly, under favourable atmospheric conditions these air parcels have the potential to transport dust and other aerosols. During the austral winter, trajectories extended north to the southern Philippines highlighting the potential for dust from central Australia to affect most of Indonesia. This includes the tropical rainforests of Borneo and New Guinea, and the coral reefs of northern Australia and the Indonesian archipelago.

We also show the potential for transport of dust from Lake Eyre to the Antarctic and much of the South Pacific and Southern Oceans. Accordingly, dust from Lake Eyre may affect biogeochemical cycles, sediment budgets, atmospheric processes and a wide range of ecosystems over a region much larger than previously thought.

This highlights the need for further research to confirm the deposition of dust in the areas mapped by the present study.

Keyword Dust transport
Lake Eyre
Air parcel trajectories
Hysplit
Antarctic
Coral Reefs
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 10 Apr 2009, 01:25:27 EST by Helen Smith on behalf of Faculty of Science