Objective versus perceived walking distances to destinations: Correspondence and predictive validity

McCormack, Gavin R., Cerin, Ester, Leslie, Eva, Du Toit, Lorinne and Owen, Neville (2008) Objective versus perceived walking distances to destinations: Correspondence and predictive validity. Environment and Behavior, 40 3: 401-425. doi:10.1177/0013916507300560

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Author McCormack, Gavin R.
Cerin, Ester
Leslie, Eva
Du Toit, Lorinne
Owen, Neville
Title Objective versus perceived walking distances to destinations: Correspondence and predictive validity
Journal name Environment and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-9165
1552-390X
Publication date 2008-05-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0013916507300560
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 3
Start page 401
End page 425
Total pages 5
Editor Robert B. Bechtel
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject C1
920401 Behaviour and Health
111712 Health Promotion
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730299 Public health not elsewhere classified
Abstract Judgments concerning features of environments do not always correspond accurately with objective measures of those same features. Moreover, perceived and objectively assessed environmental attributes, including proximity of destinations, may influence walking behavior in different ways. This study compares perceived and objectively assessed distance to several different destinations and examines whether correspondence between objective and perceived distance is influenced by age, gender, neighborhood walkability, and walking behavior. Distances to most destinations close to home are overestimated, whereas distances to those farther away are underestimated. Perceived and objective distances to certain types of destinations are differentially associated with walking behavior. Perceived environmental attributes do not consistently reflect objectively assessed attributes, and both appear to have differential effects on physical activity behavior.
Keyword Physical activity
Walking
Environment
Destination
Awareness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This version was published on May 1, 2008

 
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Created: Fri, 10 Apr 2009, 01:13:11 EST by Cathy Swart on behalf of School of Public Health