Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy part I: Who are the therapists, who are the clients, and why is songwriting used?

Baker, Felicity, Wigram, Tony, Stott, David and McFerran, Katrina (2008) Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy part I: Who are the therapists, who are the clients, and why is songwriting used?. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 17 2: 105-123. doi:10.1080/08098130809478203

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Author Baker, Felicity
Wigram, Tony
Stott, David
McFerran, Katrina
Title Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy part I: Who are the therapists, who are the clients, and why is songwriting used?
Formatted title
Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy: Part 1. Who are the therapists, who are the clients, and why is songwriting used?
Journal name Nordic Journal of Music Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0809-8131
1944-8260
Publication date 2008-07-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08098130809478203
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 105
End page 123
Total pages 19
Editor Christian Gold
Place of publication Abingdon, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 190408 Music Therapy
929999 Health not elsewhere classified
C1
Formatted abstract
Songwriting as a therapeutic intervention has received increasing attention in the field of music therapy over the past decade however much of the publications focus on clinical outcomes rather than methods of practice. This paper, part of a two-part research report into trends in the clinical practice of songwriting, aims to describe the most frequently employed goal areas across a range of clinical populations and compare these findings with the published literature. Responses to a 21-question online survey were obtained from 477 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which focused on approaches to songwriting within their practice with a single clinical population. Chi-square or comparable Exact tests (Fisher-Freeman-Halton) were applied to the data and significant associations were found according to different clinical populations particularly with respect to the aims of songwriting in clinical practice and the frequency with which songwriting is employed in practice. The data highlights that songwriting is frequently employed in developmental disability and ASD practice, with reports on songwriting with these diagnostic groups being underrepresented in the music therapy literature. The survey identified that the most frequently endorsed goal areas align with the literature base and included a) experiencing mastery, develop self-confidence, enhance self esteem; b) choice and decision making; c) develop a sense of self; d) externalising thoughts, fantasies, and emotions; e) telling the client's story; and f) gaining insight or clarifying thoughts and feelings.
Keyword Songwriting
Evidence-based practice
Music therapy method
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Music Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 10 Apr 2009, 00:28:39 EST by Mrs Gaylene Wagner on behalf of Faculty of Arts