The effect of ambient air pollution during early pregnancy on fetal ultrasonic measurements during mid-pregnancy

Hansen, Craig A., Barnett, Adrian G. and Pritchard, Gary (2008) The effect of ambient air pollution during early pregnancy on fetal ultrasonic measurements during mid-pregnancy. Environmental Health Perspectives, 116 3: 362-369. doi:10.1289/ehp.10720


Author Hansen, Craig A.
Barnett, Adrian G.
Pritchard, Gary
Title The effect of ambient air pollution during early pregnancy on fetal ultrasonic measurements during mid-pregnancy
Journal name Environmental Health Perspectives   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-6765
1552-9924
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1289/ehp.10720
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 116
Issue 3
Start page 362
End page 369
Total pages 8
Editor Erin E. Dooley
Hugh A. Tilson
Rita B. Hanson
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publisher U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Language eng
Subject C1
920501 Child Health
111401 Foetal Development and Medicine
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Formatted abstract
Background: Over the past decade there has been mounting evidence that ambient air pollution during pregnancy influences fetal growth.
Objectives: This study was designed to examine possible associations between fetal ultrasonic measurements collected from 15,623 scans (13-26 weeks gestation) and ambient air pollution during early pregnancy.
Methods: We calculated mothers' average monthly exposures over the first 4 months of pregnancy for the following pollutants: particulate matter < 10 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM10), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. We examined associations with fetal femur length (FL), biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), and abdominal circumference (AC). Final analyses included scans from only those women within 2 km of an air pollution monitoring site. We controlled for long-term trend, season, temperature, gestation, mother's age, socioeconomic status, and fetal sex.
Results: A reduction in fetal AC was associated with O3 during days 31-60 [-1.42 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI), -2.74 to -0.09], SO2 during days 61-90 (-1.67 mm; 95% CI, -2.94 to -0.40), and PM10 during days 91-120 (-0.78 mm; 95% CI, -1.49 to -0.08). Other results showed a reduction in BPD (-0.68 mm; 95% CI, -1.09 to -0.27) associated with SO2 during days 0-30, a reduction in HC (-1.02 mm; 95% CI, -1,78 to -0.26) associated with PM10 during days 91-120, and a reduction in FL associated with PM10 during days 0-30 (-0.28 mm; 95% CI, -0.48 to -0.08) and 91-120 (-0.23; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.04).
Conclusions: We found strong effects of ambient air pollution on ultrasound measures. Future research, including more individually detailed data, is needed to confirm our results.
Copyright National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Mar 2008

Keyword Air pollution
Fetal Growth
Pregnancy
Temperature
Ultrasound
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 50 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 54 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 09 Apr 2009, 21:43:40 EST by Amanda Jones on behalf of School of Medicine