Recreational Facilities and Leisure-Time Physical Activity: An Analysis of Moderators and Self-Efficacy as a Mediator.

Cerin E, Vandelanotte C, Leslie E and Merom D (2008) Recreational Facilities and Leisure-Time Physical Activity: An Analysis of Moderators and Self-Efficacy as a Mediator.. Health Psychology, 27 2(Suppl.): S126-S135. doi:10.1037/0278-6133.27.2(Suppl.).S126


Author Cerin E
Vandelanotte C
Leslie E
Merom D
Title Recreational Facilities and Leisure-Time Physical Activity: An Analysis of Moderators and Self-Efficacy as a Mediator.
Journal name Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-6133
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0278-6133.27.2(Suppl.).S126
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 27
Issue 2(Suppl.)
Start page S126
End page S135
Total pages 10
Editor Kaplan, Robert M Dr.
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Subject C1
920401 Behaviour and Health
111712 Health Promotion
Abstract Objective: To examine socio-demographic and psychosocial moderators, and self-efficacy as a mediator of the cross-sectional relationships between having access to recreational facilities and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA); to investigate the extent to which the environment-LTPA associations could be explained by self-selection to neighborhoods. Design: A two-stage stratified sampling design was used to recruit 2,650 adults (aged 20-65) from 32 urban communities varying in walkability and socioeconomic status. Participants reported perceived access to facilities and home equipment for LTPA, weekly minutes of LTPA, self-efficacy for and enjoyment of LTPA, reasons for neighborhood selection, and socio-demographic characteristics. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported recreational walking and other forms of moderate-to-vigorous LTPA expressed in MET-minutes. Results: Specific types of recreational facilities were independently associated with LTPA. Age, education, being overweight/obese, reasons for neighborhood selection, enjoyment of, and self-efficacy for LTPA moderated these relationships. Self-efficacy was not a significant mediator of these cross-sectional associations. Conclusion: These findings have potentially significant implications for the planning of environmental interventions aimed at increasing population-level LTPA particularly in those who are less attitudinally inclined to being physically active.
Keyword built environment
exercise
psychosocial factors
socio-demographics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Cancer Prevention Research Centre Publications
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Apr 2009, 21:14:52 EST by Cathy Swart on behalf of School of Public Health