Serratia Bacteremia in a Large University Hospital: Trends in Antibiotic Resistance During 10 Years and Implications for Antibiotic Use

Choi, Sang-Ho, Kim, Yang Soo, Chung, Jin-Won, Kim, Tae Hyong, Choo, Eun Ju, Kim, Mi-Na, Kim, Baek-Nam, Kim, Nam Joong, Jun Hee Woo, Jun Hee and Ryu, Jiso (2002) Serratia Bacteremia in a Large University Hospital: Trends in Antibiotic Resistance During 10 Years and Implications for Antibiotic Use. Infection Control And Hospital Epidemiology, 23 12: 740-747. doi:10.1086/502004


Author Choi, Sang-Ho
Kim, Yang Soo
Chung, Jin-Won
Kim, Tae Hyong
Choo, Eun Ju
Kim, Mi-Na
Kim, Baek-Nam
Kim, Nam Joong
Jun Hee Woo, Jun Hee
Ryu, Jiso
Title Serratia Bacteremia in a Large University Hospital: Trends in Antibiotic Resistance During 10 Years and Implications for Antibiotic Use
Journal name Infection Control And Hospital Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1011-8934
Publication date 2002-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/502004
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 23
Issue 12
Start page 740
End page 747
Total pages 8
Place of publication N. J. Thorofare
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Subject 110309 Infectious Diseases
111205 Chemotherapy
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify antibiotic resistance trends and risk factors for resistance of Serratia species to third‐generation cephalosporins.

DESIGN: Retrospective survey of medical records.

SETTING: A 2,200‐bed, tertiary‐care hospital.

PATIENTS: One hundred twenty‐two patients with Serratia bacteremia between January 1991 and June 2001.

METHODS: Infectious disease physicians collected data from medical records regarding patient demographics, underlying disease or condition, portal of entry, microorganism, antibiogram, complications, antibiotics received, and outcome.

RESULTS: Among 122 Serratia isolates, 117 (95.9%) were Serratia marcescens and 110 (90.2%) were of nosocomial origin. During the study period, the 122 isolates showed a high rate of resistance to third‐generation cephalosporins (45.9%) and extended‐spectrum penicillins (56.6%). The resistance rate to ciprofloxacin was 32.0%. The resistance rate to third‐generation cephalosporins increased from 31.7% for 1991 to 1995 to 54.9% for 1996 to 1998 and 50.0% for 1999 to 2001. In the multivariate analysis, prior use of a second‐generation cephalosporin (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 5.90; 95% confidence interval [CI95], 1.41 to 24.6; P = .015) or a third‐generation cephalosporin (OR, 3.26; CI95, 1.20 to 8.87; P = .020) was a strong independent risk factor for resistance to third‐generation cephalosporins. The overall case‐fatality rate was 25.4% (Serratia bacteremia–related case‐fatality rate, 13.1%).

CONCLUSION: Prior use of a second‐ or third‐generation cephalosporin was the most important risk factor for bacteremia with Serratia resistant to third‐generation cephalosporins, suggesting the need for antibiotic control. The potential role of patient‐to‐patient spread could not be fully evaluated in this retrospective study.

Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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