Burden of disease and injury in Australia in the new millennium: measuring health loss from diseases, injuries and risk factors

Begg, Stephen, Vos, Eric T., Bridget Barker, Lucy Stanley and Lopez, Alan D. (2008) Burden of disease and injury in Australia in the new millennium: measuring health loss from diseases, injuries and risk factors. Medical Journal of Australia, 188 1: 36-40.


Author Begg, Stephen
Vos, Eric T.
Bridget Barker
Lucy Stanley
Lopez, Alan D.
Title Burden of disease and injury in Australia in the new millennium: measuring health loss from diseases, injuries and risk factors
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 188
Issue 1
Start page 36
End page 40
Total pages 4
Editor Martin Van Der Weyen
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Australiasian Medical Publishing company P/L
Language eng
Subject C1
920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Abstract Objective: To describe the magnitude and distribution of health problems in Australia, in order to identify key opportunities for health gain. Design: Descriptive epidemiological models for a comprehensive set of diseases and injuries of public health importance in Australia were developed using a range of data sources, methods and assumptions. Health loss associated with each condition was derived using normative techniques and quantified for various subpopulations, risks to health, and points in time. The baseline year for comparisons was 2003. Main outcome measures: Health loss expressed as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and presented as proportions of total DALYs and DALY rates (crude and age-standardised) per 1000 population. Results: A third of total health loss in 2003 was explained by 14 selected health risks. DALY rates were 31.7% higher in the lowest socioeconomic quintile than in the highest, and 26.5% higher in remote areas than in major cities. Total DALY rates were estimated to decline for most conditions over the 20 years from 2003 to 2023, but for some causes, most notably diabetes, they were projected to increase. Conclusion: Despite steady improvements in Australia’s health over the past decade, there are still opportunities for further progress. Significant gains can be made through achievable changes in exposure to a limited number of well established health risks.
Keyword Burden Of Disease
Australia
Millennium
risk factors
Australia
Chronic Disease
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Epidemiologic Methods
Health Behavior
Humans
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk Factors
Wounds and Injuries
economics
statistics & numerical data
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 09 Apr 2009, 02:19:47 EST by Sarah Calderwood on behalf of School of Public Health