Prevalence and correlates of multiple cancer risk behaviors in an Australian population-based survey: results from the Queensland Cancer Risk Study

Hausdorf, Katrin, Eakin, Elizabeth, Whiteman, David, Rogers, Carla, Aitken, Joanne and Newman, Beth (2008) Prevalence and correlates of multiple cancer risk behaviors in an Australian population-based survey: results from the Queensland Cancer Risk Study. Cancer Causes & Control, 19 10: 1339-1347. doi:10.1007/s10552-008-9205-y


Author Hausdorf, Katrin
Eakin, Elizabeth
Whiteman, David
Rogers, Carla
Aitken, Joanne
Newman, Beth
Title Prevalence and correlates of multiple cancer risk behaviors in an Australian population-based survey: results from the Queensland Cancer Risk Study
Journal name Cancer Causes & Control   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0957-5243
Publication date 2008-12-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10552-008-9205-y
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Issue 10
Start page 1339
End page 1347
Total pages 9
Editor Graham A. Colditz
Place of publication Dordrecht, The Netherland
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Subject C1
920401 Behaviour and Health
111716 Preventive Medicine
Abstract To report on the prevalence, clustering, and correlates of behavioral risk factors for cancer in the Queensland, Australia, population.
Formatted abstract
Objective To report on the prevalence, clustering, and correlates of behavioral risk factors for cancer in the Queensland, Australia, population.
Design, setting, and participants The Queensland Cancer Risk Study was a population-based survey of 9419 Queensland residents aged 20–75 years. Information was collected through anonymous computer-assisted telephone interviews between February and November 2004.
Main outcome measures Prevalence of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, physical inactivity, sun exposure, and inadequate fruit and vegetable intake, weighted by age, gender, and geographic region.
Results The majority of respondents reported between two and four cancer risk behaviors (79.4%). Men, those younger than 59 years and those with lower educational attainment had more than twofold increased odds of reporting multiple cancer risk factors. Marital status and geographic region were moderately associated with cancer risk. Smoking, high levels of alcohol consumption, and sun exposure were associated with up to twofold increased odds of engaging in multiple additional risk factors.
Conclusions This study identified key subgroups of the Queensland population with increased odds of engaging in multiple risk behaviors for cancer, particularly younger men and people with lower educational attainment. Individual behavioral risk factors can also exert a significant impact on the overall risk profile, and this may be a useful consideration for public health campaigns that target key health behaviors.

Keyword Multiple risk factors
Cancer
Tobacco
Alcohol
Obesity
Physical activity
Sun exposure
Diet
Health behaviors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Cancer Prevention Research Centre Publications
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2009, 21:13:24 EST by Cathy Swart on behalf of School of Public Health