The Evolutionary Significance of Affect in Groups: Communication and Group Bonding

Spoor, J. R. and Kelly, J. R. (2004) The Evolutionary Significance of Affect in Groups: Communication and Group Bonding. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 7 4: 398-412. doi:10.1177/1368430204046145


Author Spoor, J. R.
Kelly, J. R.
Title The Evolutionary Significance of Affect in Groups: Communication and Group Bonding
Journal name Group Processes and Intergroup Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4302
Publication date 2004-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1368430204046145
Volume 7
Issue 4
Start page 398
End page 412
Total pages 15
Place of publication London
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Subject 170113 Social and Community Psychology
Abstract Recent theorizing and research has attempted to explicate the functions of moods and emotions within small groups. In this paper, we examine these areas and suggest that affect in groups, as well as specific mechanisms to regulate and maintain certain affective states in groups, have had important roles in promoting group survival over evolutionary history. Specifically, we suggest that affect in groups serves a coordination function, which can take one of two forms. First, affect in groups quickly provides information about the environment and group structure to other group members, thus coordinating group activity via a communication function. Second, shared affect in groups coordinates group activity through fostering group bonds and group loyalty. These two functions of affect in groups are closely related and mutually reinforcing. Current research and directions for future research within an evolutionary perspective are also discussed.
Keyword affect
emotional contagion
evolutionary theory
groups
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 76 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2009, 20:00:51 EST by Maryanne Watson on behalf of School of Psychology