Pre- and post-harvest influences on physiological dormancy alleviation of an Australian Asteraceae species: Actinobole uliginosum (A.Gray) H.Eichler

Hoyle, Gemma L., Daws, Matthew, I., Steadman, Kathryn J. and Adkins, Stephen W. (2008) Pre- and post-harvest influences on physiological dormancy alleviation of an Australian Asteraceae species: Actinobole uliginosum (A.Gray) H.Eichler. Seed Science Research, 18 4: 191-199. doi:10.1017/S0960258508082986


Author Hoyle, Gemma L.
Daws, Matthew, I.
Steadman, Kathryn J.
Adkins, Stephen W.
Title Pre- and post-harvest influences on physiological dormancy alleviation of an Australian Asteraceae species: Actinobole uliginosum (A.Gray) H.Eichler
Formatted title
Pre- and post-harvest influences on physiological dormancy alleviation of an Australian Asteraceae species: Actinobole uliginosum (A.Gray) H.Eichler
Journal name Seed Science Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0960-2585
1475-2735
Publication date 2008-12-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0960258508082986
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 191
End page 199
Total pages 9
Place of publication Cambridge, U.K.
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
961205 Rehabilitation of Degraded Mining Environments
060705 Plant Physiology
0607 Plant Biology
Abstract The effects of maternal air temperature and soil moisture upon seed physiological dormancy (PD) alleviation of an Australian native Asteraceae were investigated. From the onset of flowering, Actinobole uliginosum plants growing ex situ were subjected to either a warm (mean 26 degrees C) or cool (mean 17 degrees C) temperature regime, with adequate or limited water availability. In the warm environment, the reproductive phase was accelerated, and plants yielded fewer seeds over a shorter, earlier harvest period, when compared to those in the cool environment. Initial germination of all seeds was low (< 20% at 15 degrees C) due to PD, which was gradually alleviated by a dry after-ripening (DAR) treatment (34/20 degrees C, 40% relative humidity, in darkness). Seeds from plants grown in the warm environment were more responsive to DAR than seeds from the cool environment, but maternal plant water availability had little effect on dormancy status. Germination was higher at 15 C than at 25/15 degrees C, reaching a plateau of c. 80% germination after 20 weeks DAR. Before DAR, application of GA(3) had little impact on seeds, which would consequently be classified as having deep PD if tested at the time of dispersal. However, DAR caused seeds to become increasingly responsive to GA(3), reaching 97% germination at 15 C following just 4 weeks of DAR, which would indicate non-deep PD if seeds were tested following a period of warm, dry storage. Maternal air temperature regulates PD status of A. uliginosum, such that seeds collected from a warmer environment are likely to be more responsive to DAR. Post-harvest storage in an environment suitable for DAR affects seed response to GA(3), which has implications for germination stimulation and dormancy classification.
Formatted abstract
The effects of maternal air temperature and soil moisture upon seed physiological dormancy (PD) alleviation of an Australian native Asteraceae were investigated. From the onset of flowering, Actinobole uliginosum plants growing ex situ were subjected to either a warm (mean 26°C) or cool (mean 17°C) temperature regime, with adequate or limited water availability. In the warm environment, the reproductive phase was accelerated, and plants yielded fewer seeds over a shorter, earlier harvest period, when compared to those in the cool environment. Initial germination of all seeds was low ( < 20% at 15°C) due to PD, which was gradually alleviated by a dry after-ripening (DAR) treatment (34/20°C, 40% relative humidity, in darkness). Seeds from plants grown in the warm environment were more responsive to DAR than seeds from the cool environment, but maternal plant water availability had little effect on dormancy status. Germination was higher at 15°C than at 25/15°C, reaching a plateau of c. 80% germination after 20 weeks DAR. Before DAR, application of GA3 had little impact on seeds, which would consequently be classified as having deep PD if tested at the time of dispersal. However, DAR caused seeds to become increasingly responsive to GA3, reaching 97% germination at 15°C following just 4 weeks of DAR, which would indicate non-deep PD if seeds were tested following a period of warm, dry storage. Maternal air temperature regulates PD status of A. uliginosum, such that seeds collected from a warmer environment are likely to be more responsive to DAR. Post-harvest storage in an environment suitable for DAR affects seed response to GA3, which has implications for germination stimulation and dormancy classification.
Keyword Actinobloe uliginosum
After-ripening
Asteraceae
Australia
climate
Dormancy
Seeds
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2009, 18:24:26 EST by Emma Cushworth on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences