Predictors of initiating and maintaining active commuting to work using transport and public health perspectives in Australia

Merom, Dafna, Miller, Yvette D., van der Ploeg, Hidde P. and Bauman, Adrian (2008) Predictors of initiating and maintaining active commuting to work using transport and public health perspectives in Australia. Preventive Medicine, 47 3: 342-346. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.03.014


Author Merom, Dafna
Miller, Yvette D.
van der Ploeg, Hidde P.
Bauman, Adrian
Title Predictors of initiating and maintaining active commuting to work using transport and public health perspectives in Australia
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
Publication date 2008-09-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.03.014
Open Access Status
Volume 47
Issue 3
Start page 342
End page 346
Total pages 5
Editor A. Morabia
Place of publication San Diego, CA, USA
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject C1
111712 Health Promotion
920401 Behaviour and Health
Abstract Objective: To identify predictors for initiating and maintaining active commuting (AC) to work following the 2003 Australia's Walk to Work Day (WTWD) campaign. Methods: Pre- and post-campaign telephone surveys of a cohort of working age (18-65years) adults (n = 1100, 55% response rate). Two dependent campaign outcomes were assessed: initiating or maintaining AC (i.e., walk/cycle and public transport) on a single day (WTWD), and increasing or maintaining health-enhancing active commuting (HEAC) level (≥ 30min/day) in a usual week following WTWD campaign. Results: A significant population-level increase in HEAC (3.9%) was observed (McNemar's χ = 6.53, p = 0.01) with 136 (19.0%) achieving HEAC at post campaign. High confidence in incorporating walking into commute, being active pre-campaign and younger age (< 46years) were positively associated with both outcomes. The utility of AC for avoiding parking hassles (AOR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.6), for less expense (AOR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.1), for increasing one's health (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1-5.6) and for clean air (AOR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.0-4.4) predicted HEAC outcome whereas avoiding the stress of driving (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0) and the hassle of parking predicted the single-day AC. Conclusions: Transportation interventions targeting parking and costs could be further enhanced by emphasizing health benefits of AC. AC was less likely to occur among inactive employees.
Formatted abstract
Objective. To identify predictors for initiating and maintaining active commuting (AC) to work following the 2003 Australia's Walk to Work Day (WTWD) campaign.

Methods. Pre- and post-campaign telephone surveys of a cohort of working age (18-65years) adults (n= 1100, 55% response rate). Two dependent campaign outcomes were assessed: initiating or maintaining AC (i.e., walk/cycle and public transport) on a single day (WTWD), and increasing or maintaining health-enhancing active commuting (HEAC) level (>= 30min/day) in a usual week following WTWD campaign.

Results
. A significant population-level increase in HEAC (3.9%) was observed (McNemar's chi(2)=6.53, p=0.01) with 136 (19.0%) achieving HEAC at post campaign. High confidence in incorporating walking into commute, being active pre-campaign and younger age (< 46years) were positively associated with both outcomes. The utility of AC for avoiding parking hassles (AOR=2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.6), for less expense (AOR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.1), for increasing one's health (AOR=2.5, 95% Cl: 1.1-5.6) and for clean air (AOR=2.2, 95% CI: 1.0-4.4) predicted HEAC outcome whereas avoiding the stress of driving (AOR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0) and the hassle of parking predicted the single-day AC.

Conclusions. Transportation interventions targeting parking and costs could be further enhanced by emphasizing health benefits of AC. AC was less likely to occur among inactive employees. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Commuting
Work
Adults
Physical activity
Health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 8 April 2008.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 07 Apr 2009, 21:08:37 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology