Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281]

Chin A Paw, Marijke J. M., van Poppel, Mireille N. M., Twisk, Jos W. R. and van Mechelen, Willem (2004) Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281]. BMC Geriatrics, 4 5: . doi:10.1186/1471-2318-4-5


Author Chin A Paw, Marijke J. M.
van Poppel, Mireille N. M.
Twisk, Jos W. R.
van Mechelen, Willem
Title Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281]
Journal name BMC Geriatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2318
Publication date 2004-07-02
DOI 10.1186/1471-2318-4-5
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 4
Issue 5
Total pages 9
Place of publication London
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
Formatted abstract
Background
Regular physical activity may improve different aspects of wellbeing in older people, such as quality of life, vitality and depression. However, there is little experimental evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, we examined the effect of different training protocols on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities.

Methods
Subjects (n = 173, aged 64 to 94 years, living in long-term care facilities), were randomized to six months of three different moderate-intensity group exercise training protocols, or to an 'educational' control condition. Exercise consisted of two 45–60-minute training sessions per week of 1) resistance training; 2) all-round, functional training; or 3) a combination of both. Perceived health, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), the Vitality Plus Scale (VPS) and the Dementia Quality of Life questionnaire (DQoL) were administered at baseline and after six months.

Results
In the combined training group a small but significant decline was seen in perceived health, DQoL and VPS score compared to the control group.

Conclusions
We conclude that neither strength training nor all-round, functional training of moderate intensity is effective in improving quality of life, vitality or depression of older people living in long-term care facilities.
Keyword frail elderly
exercise programs
psychological wellbeing
depression
quality of life
Additional Notes Received: 3 September 2003; Accepted: 2 July 2004; Published: 2 July 2004.

 
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