The Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiopulmonary Fitness, and Subcutaneous Trunk Fat as Independent Determinants of Arterial Stiffness : The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

Ferreira, Isabel, Henry, Ronald M. A., Twisk, Jos W. R., van Mechelen, Willem, Kemper, Han C. G. and Stehouwer, Coen D. A. (2005) The Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiopulmonary Fitness, and Subcutaneous Trunk Fat as Independent Determinants of Arterial Stiffness : The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165 8: 875-882. doi:10.1001/archinte.165.8.875

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Author Ferreira, Isabel
Henry, Ronald M. A.
Twisk, Jos W. R.
van Mechelen, Willem
Kemper, Han C. G.
Stehouwer, Coen D. A.
Title The Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiopulmonary Fitness, and Subcutaneous Trunk Fat as Independent Determinants of Arterial Stiffness : The Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study
Journal name Archives of Internal Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-9926
Publication date 2005-04-25
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1001/archinte.165.8.875
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 165
Issue 8
Start page 875
End page 882
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher American Medical Association
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background The mechanisms that link the metabolic syndrome to increased cardiovascular risk are incompletely understood, especially in young people. We therefore examined whether the metabolic syndrome was associated with arterial stiffness and whether any such associations were independent of cardiopulmonary fitness and subcutaneous trunk fat.

Methods Cross-sectional analyses of data on 364 men and women aged 36 years from the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study (ninth follow-up measurement, year 2000). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was defined by a slightly modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) definition. Arterial stiffness was ultrasonically estimated by distensibility and compliance of the carotid, femoral, and brachial arteries and by the carotid elastic modulus.

Results The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in this young adult population was 18.3% in men and 3.2% in women. Individuals with the syndrome compared with individuals without risk factors had 11.2% and 17.0% less distensibility and 9.0% and 18.2% less compliance of the carotid and femoral arteries, respectively, and 15.9% higher carotid elastic modulus. After adjustment for cardiopulmonary fitness and subcutaneous trunk fat, the metabolic syndrome remained significantly associated with stiffness of the carotid but not the femoral artery. In addition, poor cardiopulmonary fitness and high subcutaneous trunk fat were associated with arterial stiffness, and this was independent of the metabolic syndrome.

Conclusions A modified NCEP definition of the metabolic syndrome identified young individuals with increased arterial stiffness. The mechanisms that link the metabolic syndrome, poor cardiopulmonary fitness, and high subcutaneous trunk fat to greater arterial stiffness overlap but are partly independent of each other.
Keyword Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
MEDICINE, GENERAL & INTERNAL
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 06 Apr 2009, 19:32:44 EST by Maryanne Watson on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences