Plantar Fasciitis: Current Concepts To Expedite Healing

Glazer, James L. and Brukner, Peter (2004) Plantar Fasciitis: Current Concepts To Expedite Healing. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 32 11: 24-28.


Author Glazer, James L.
Brukner, Peter
Title Plantar Fasciitis: Current Concepts To Expedite Healing
Journal name The Physician and Sportsmedicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-3847
Publication date 2004-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Volume 32
Issue 11
Start page 24
End page 28
Total pages 5
Place of publication Minneapolis
Publisher McGraw-Hil
Language eng
Subject 110604 Sports Medicine
Abstract Plantar fasciitis is a degenerative condition affecting many active people. Anatomic and biomechanical factors can contribute to its genesis, as can overuse. Clinicians can recommend correcting gait disorders, modifying footwear, using tension night splints, and stretching tight calf and plantar tissues to bring about lasting relief. Anti-inflammatory modalities, such as medications, iontophoresis, and corticosteroid injection generally provide temporary improvement. Recent studies on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy are conflicting. A small percentage of patients who have refractory symptoms may benefit from surgical division of the plantar fascia.
Keyword Sports medicine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 06 Apr 2009, 19:16:11 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences