Hisao Juran no tabi suru shojo-tachi: Girls on the road in Hisao Juran's fiction

Aoyama, T. (2008) Hisao Juran no tabi suru shojo-tachi: Girls on the road in Hisao Juran's fiction. PAJLS: Proceedings of the Association for Japanese Literary Studies, 8 354-364.

Author Aoyama, T.
Title Hisao Juran no tabi suru shojo-tachi: Girls on the road in Hisao Juran's fiction
Formatted title
Hisao Jūran no tabi suru shōjo-tachi: Girls on the road in Hisao Jūran's fiction
Journal name PAJLS: Proceedings of the Association for Japanese Literary Studies
ISSN 1531-5533
Publication date 2008
Volume 8
Start page 354
End page 364
Total pages 11
Editor Sekine, E.
Place of publication USA
Publisher Association for Japanese Literary Studies
Collection year 2009
Language jpn
Subject C1
200518 Literature in Japanese
200205 Culture, Gender, Sexuality
950203 Languages and Literature
Abstract Hisao Juran's novels contain almost without fail movement through time and space and wanderings in foreign lands or foreign cultural spheres. This paper examines the border-crossing, adventures, and sightseeing of three girl protagonists in his novels: Nonsharan dochuki (A Book of Nonchalant Travels, 1934), Kyarako-san (Miss Calico, 1939) and Daikon (Giant Radish, 1947-8). The comic travels in France of Tanu ('raccoon') and her partner Konkichi ('fox') represent the 'nonsense' genre and the modernism of the pre-war period. Miss Calico (nicknamed so because she wears calico rather than silk underwear) is the daughter of an army officer and courageously confronts all sorts of difficulties: the setting, seemingly, is Japan at war. After the defeat, on the other hand, Daikon rushes about in an effort to save 'that person' (the Emperor) and the nation from extinction. While they thus reflect their respective periods, these three works at the same time contain elements that transgress and transcend their epoch. By 'rubbing' (Culler) these texts against various other texts, I will show how these girls are completely liberated from prejudices and inferiority complexes regarding differences in language, sex, gender, physical features, and class.
Formatted abstract
Hisao Jūran's novels contain almost without fail movement through time and space and wanderings in foreign lands or foreign cultural spheres. This paper examines the border-crossing, adventures, and sightseeing of three girl protagonists in his novels: Nonsharan dōchūki (A Book of Nonchalant Travels, 1934), Kyarako-san (Miss Calico, 1939) and Daikon (Giant Radish, 1947-8). The comic travels in France of Tanu ('raccoon') and her partner Konkichi ('fox') represent the 'nonsense' genre and the modernism of the pre-war period. Miss Calico (nicknamed so because she wears calico rather than silk underwear) is the daughter of an army officer and courageously confronts all sorts of difficulties: the setting, seemingly, is Japan at war. After the defeat, on the other hand, Daikon rushes about in an effort to save 'that person' (the Emperor) and the nation from extinction. While they thus reflect their respective periods, these three works at the same time contain elements that transgress and transcend their epoch. By 'rubbing' (Culler) these texts against various other texts, I will show how these girls are completely liberated from prejudices and inferiority complexes regarding differences in language, sex, gender, physical features, and class.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes DATE OF PUBLICATION: Papers from conference held in 2007 not published in Proceedings of the AJLS until 2008.

 
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 17:00:01 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures