Comparing different approach and avoidance models of learning and personality in the prediction of work, university, and leadership outcomes

Jackson, Chris J., Hobman, Elizabeth V., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Martin, Robin (2009) Comparing different approach and avoidance models of learning and personality in the prediction of work, university, and leadership outcomes. British Journal of Psychology, 100 2: 283-312. doi:10.1348/000712608X322900


Author Jackson, Chris J.
Hobman, Elizabeth V.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Martin, Robin
Title Comparing different approach and avoidance models of learning and personality in the prediction of work, university, and leadership outcomes
Journal name British Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1269
Publication date 2009-05-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1348/000712608X322900
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 100
Issue 2
Start page 283
End page 312
Total pages 30
Editor Peter Mitchell
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher The British Psychological Society
Language eng
Subject C1
179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Jackson (2005) developed a hybrid model of personality and learning, known as the learning styles profiler (LSP) which was designed to span biological, socio-cognitive, and experiential research foci of personality and learning research. The hybrid model argues that functional and dysfunctional learning outcomes can be best understood in terms of how cognitions and experiences control, discipline, and re-express the biologically based scale of sensation-seeking. In two studies with part-time workers undertaking tertiary education (N equals 137 and 58), established models of approach and avoidance from each of the three different research foci were compared with Jackson's hybrid model in their predictiveness of leadership, work, and university outcomes using self-report and supervisor ratings. Results showed that the hybrid model was generally optimal and, as hypothesized, that goal orientation was a mediator of sensation-seeking on outcomes (work performance, university performance, leader behaviours, and counterproductive work behaviour). Our studies suggest that the hybrid model has considerable promise as a predictor of work and educational outcomes as well as dysfunctional outcomes.
Formatted abstract
Jackson (2005) developed a hybrid model of personality and learning, known as the learning styles profiler (LSP) which was designed to span biological, socio-cognitive, and experiential research foci of personality and learning research. The hybrid model argues that functional and dysfunctional learning outcomes can be best understood in terms of how cognitions and experiences control, discipline, and re-express the biologically based scale of sensation-seeking. In two studies with part-time workers undertaking tertiary education (N=137 and 58), established models of approach and avoidance from each of the three different research foci were compared with Jackson's hybrid model in their predictiveness of leadership, work, and university outcomes using self-report and supervisor ratings. Results showed that the hybrid model was generally optimal and, as hypothesized, that goal orientation was a mediator of sensation-seeking on outcomes (work performance, university performance, leader behaviours, and counterproductive work behaviour). Our studies suggest that the hybrid model has considerable promise as a predictor of work and educational outcomes as well as dysfunctional outcomes.

Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 04 Apr 2009, 01:27:06 EST by Paul Rollo on behalf of School of Psychology