Fat-Free Body Mass Is the Most Important Body Composition Determinant of 10-yr Longitudinal Development of Lumbar Bone in Adult Men and Women

Bakker, Ingrid, Twisk, Jos W. R., van Mechelen, Willem and Kemper, Han C. G. (2003) Fat-Free Body Mass Is the Most Important Body Composition Determinant of 10-yr Longitudinal Development of Lumbar Bone in Adult Men and Women. The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 88 6: 2607-2613. doi:10.1210/jc.2002-021538


Author Bakker, Ingrid
Twisk, Jos W. R.
van Mechelen, Willem
Kemper, Han C. G.
Title Fat-Free Body Mass Is the Most Important Body Composition Determinant of 10-yr Longitudinal Development of Lumbar Bone in Adult Men and Women
Journal name The journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-972X
Publication date 2003-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1210/jc.2002-021538
Open Access Status
Volume 88
Issue 6
Start page 2607
End page 2613
Total pages 7
Place of publication Bethesda, MD
Publisher Endocrine Society
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract he purpose of this study was to analyze the longitudinal relationship between body composition and lumbar bone mineral density (LBMD) and lumbar bone mineral content (LBMC) in (young) adults over a 10-yr period. The data are from the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study. Two hundred twenty-five men and 241 women were measured at 27, 32, and/or 36 yr of age. Nine body composition components were explored: total body weight, standing height, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist to hip ratio, sum of four skinfolds, fat mass, and fat-free mass (FFM). Stratified analyses were performed by gender and adjustment was made for physical activity and calcium intake. Univariate multilevel analyses indicated that FFM was significantly positively related to the 10-yr development of both LBMD and LBMC in both sexes. Total body weight, standing height, and body mass index also showed a significant positive univariate relationships with LBMD and LBMC in both sexes, fat mass only with female LBMD. All best predictive multiple regression models included FFM, explaining 4–27% of the variation in bone mineral over this 10-yr period. Because FFM can be interpreted as a proxy for skeletal muscle mass, these results indicate the importance of muscle contractions on bone to increase bone strength in (young) adults.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 04 Apr 2009, 00:18:11 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences