Screening of Athletes for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

Holzer, Karen and Brukner, Peter (2004) Screening of Athletes for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 14 3: 134-138. doi:10.1097/00042752-200405000-00005


Author Holzer, Karen
Brukner, Peter
Title Screening of Athletes for Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction
Journal name Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1050-642X
Publication date 2004-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/00042752-200405000-00005
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Issue 3
Start page 134
End page 138
Total pages 5
Place of publication New York, NY
Publisher Raven Press
Language eng
Subject 110604 Sports Medicine
Abstract AB colon; Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has a high prevalence in elite athletes, particularly endurance athletes, winter athletes and swimmers. Recent studies have shown that a clinical diagnosis of EIB has only a moderate sensitivity and specificity for EIB. This finding in conjunction with a recent ruling by the IOC-medical commission that all athletes competing in initially the 2003 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, and now the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens require objective evidence of EIB, support the need for bronchial provocation challenge tests in the diagnosis of EIB. The recommended bronchial provocation challenge test is the eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH) challenge; this challenge test has been shown to have both a high sensitivity and specificity for EIB. Pharmacological challenge tests, such as the methacholine challenge test, have been shown to have only a low sensitivity but high specificity for EIB in elite athletes, and are thus not recommended in the athlete with pure EIB. Exercise challenge tests performed both in the laboratory and field have a high specificity for EIB; however those in the laboratory have only a moderate sensitivity for EIB in elite athletes, whilst those in the field are limited by problems with standardization. The osmotic challenge tests, such as the hypertonic saline and newer inhaled dry powder mannitol challenge have both a high sensitivity and specificity for EIB, and may be used as an alternative to the EVH challenge. (C) 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Keyword Sports medicine
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 04 Apr 2009, 00:00:06 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences