The Effectiveness of Worksite Physical Activity Programs on Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health

Proper, Karin, Koning, Marjan, van der Beek, Allard, Hildebrandt, Vincent, Bosscher, Ruud and van Mechelen, Willem (2003) The Effectiveness of Worksite Physical Activity Programs on Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health. Clinical journal of sport medicine, 13 2: 106-117. doi:10.1097/00042752-200303000-00008


Author Proper, Karin
Koning, Marjan
van der Beek, Allard
Hildebrandt, Vincent
Bosscher, Ruud
van Mechelen, Willem
Title The Effectiveness of Worksite Physical Activity Programs on Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health
Journal name Clinical journal of sport medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1050-642X
Publication date 2003-03-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1097/00042752-200303000-00008
Open Access Status
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 106
End page 117
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY
Publisher Raven Press
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract Objective: To critically review the literature with respect to the effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs on physical activity, physical fitness, and health. Data Sources: A search for relevant English-written papers published between 1980 and 2000 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Sportdiscus, CINAHL, and Psychlit. The key words used involved a combination of concepts regarding type of study, study population, intervention, and outcome measure. In addition, a search was performed in our personal databases, as well as a reference search of the studies retrieved. Study Selection: The following criteria for inclusion were used: 1) randomized, controlled trial or nonrandomized, controlled trial; 2) working population; 3) worksite intervention program to promote employees' physical activity or physical fitness; and 4) physical activity, physical fitness, or health-related outcomes. Data Extraction: Two reviewers independently evaluated the quality of relevant studies using a predefined set of nine methodological criteria. Conclusions regarding the effectiveness of a worksite physical activity programs were based on a rating system consisting of five levels of evidence. Data Synthesis: Fifteen randomized, controlled trials and 11 nonrandomized, controlled trials met the criteria for inclusion and were reviewed. Six randomized, controlled trials and none of the nonrandomized, controlled trials were of high methodological quality. Strong evidence was found for a positive effect of a worksite physical activity program on physical activity and musculoskeletal disorders. Limited evidence was found for a positive effect on fatigue. For physical fitness, general health, blood serum lipids, and blood pressure, inconclusive or no evidence was found for a positive effect. Conclusions: To increase the level of physical activity and to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders, we support implementation of worksite physical activity programs. For the other outcome measures, scientific evidence of the effectiveness of such a program is still limited or inconclusive, which is mainly the result of the small number of high-quality trials. Therefore, we recommend performing more randomized, controlled trials of high methodological quality, taking into account criteria such as randomization, blinding, and compliance.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 21:37:36 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences