Birth Weight, Adult Body Composition, and Subcutaneous Fat Distribution

Velde, Saskia J. te, Twisk, Jos W. R., van Mechelen, Willem and Kempe, Han C. G. (2003) Birth Weight, Adult Body Composition, and Subcutaneous Fat Distribution. Obesity research, 11 2: 202-208. doi:10.1038/oby.2003.32


Author Velde, Saskia J. te
Twisk, Jos W. R.
van Mechelen, Willem
Kempe, Han C. G.
Title Birth Weight, Adult Body Composition, and Subcutaneous Fat Distribution
Journal name Obesity research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1071-7323
Publication date 2003-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/oby.2003.32
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 202
End page 208
Total pages 7
Place of publication Baton Rouge, LA
Publisher North American Association for the Study of Obesity
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract Objectives: To investigate if birth weight is related to both body mass index (BMI) and distribution of subcutaneous fat at adult age. Research Methods and Procedures: A 9-year longitudinal study was performed in 229 subjects (192 women) with ages ranging from 27 to 36 years. Birth weight was retrieved by a questionnaire, and adult weight, height, skinfold thicknesses, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were repeatedly measured at mean ages 27, 29, 31, and 36 years. BMI, sum of four skinfolds (S4S), the ratio between two truncal skinfolds and S4S (SS/S4S), and the ratio between WHR and the cross-sectional area of the left thigh were calculated with the available data. Results: The adjusted model showed that in women, birth weight was significantly negatively related to adult S4S [beta = -5.211; (-9.768 to -0.654)], waist circumference [beta = -1.449; (-2.829 to -0.069)], and SS/S4S ratio [beta = -3.579; (-5.296 to -1.862)]. In men, a significant negative association was observed between birth weight and adult WHR [beta = -1.096; (-2.092 to -0.100)] only. Other relationships showed, although not significantly, the same negative trend, namely that lower birth weight is related to higher adult body fat mass (S4S) and a more truncal subcutaneous fat distribution (SS/S4S). No associations were found between birth weight and either adult BMI or the cross-sectional area of the thigh. Discussion: Lower birth weight is, in both adult men and women, related to a higher adult subcutaneous fat mass and a more truncal distribution of subcutaneous fat, indicating a higher risk for obesity.
Keyword fetal origins
birth weight
body composition
body fat distribution
longitudinal research
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 21:24:56 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences