In vitro gas production profile and the formation of end products from non- washable, insoluble washable and soluble washable fractions in some concentrate ingredients

Azarfar, Arash, Williams, Barbara A ., Boer, Huug and Tamminga, Seerp (2007) In vitro gas production profile and the formation of end products from non- washable, insoluble washable and soluble washable fractions in some concentrate ingredients. Journal of the science of food and agriculture, 87 7: 1345-1355. doi:10.1002/jsfa.2856


Author Azarfar, Arash
Williams, Barbara A .
Boer, Huug
Tamminga, Seerp
Title In vitro gas production profile and the formation of end products from non- washable, insoluble washable and soluble washable fractions in some concentrate ingredients
Journal name Journal of the science of food and agriculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1097-0010
0022-5142
Publication date 2007-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.2856
Volume 87
Issue 7
Start page 1345
End page 1355
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publisher John Wiley & Sons on behalf of SCI.
Language eng
Subject 070204 Animal Nutrition
Abstract A procedure that mimics washing in the in situ incubation technique, combined with an in vitro gas and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production technique, was used to verify the assumption that rumen degradation behaviour of material washed out of nylon bags is instantaneous and complete. In a 6 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments with three replicates, fractions of maize, barley, milo, yellow peas, lupins (a mixture of white and spotted lupins) and round-seeded brown faba beans were subjected to an in vitro incubation technique. Fractions were whole (WHO), non-washable (NWF), insoluble washable (ISWF) and soluble washable (SWF). In a manually operated in vitro fermentation system, another 24 samples of the same substrates were fermented for VFA and ammonia analysis. Except in lupins, ISWF in the concentrate ingredients was very rich in starch. SWF was relatively rich in ash, crude protein, soluble sugars, and a residual unknown fraction but contained only a negligible quantity of starch. Thus, the fermentation characteristics of ISWF were more like WHO and NWF than SWF. Total gas production of SWF was considerably lower than the other fractions. A very rapidly degradable fraction was seen in the first phase of degradation of SWF. The pattern of fermentation end-product formation for SWF differed from that of the other fractions. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry
Keyword concentrate ingredients
feed fractionation
gas production technique
washable fraction
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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