Application of in vitro anthelmintic sensitivity assays to canine parasitology: Detecting resistance to pyrantel in Ancylostoma caninum

Kopp, Steven R., Coleman, Glen T., McCarthy, James S. and Kotze, Andrew C. (2008) Application of in vitro anthelmintic sensitivity assays to canine parasitology: Detecting resistance to pyrantel in Ancylostoma caninum. Veterinary Parasitology, 152 3-4: 284-293. doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2007.12.020


Author Kopp, Steven R.
Coleman, Glen T.
McCarthy, James S.
Kotze, Andrew C.
Title Application of in vitro anthelmintic sensitivity assays to canine parasitology: Detecting resistance to pyrantel in Ancylostoma caninum
Formatted title
Application of in vitro anthelmintic sensitivity assays to canine parasitology: Detecting resistance to pyrantel in Ancylostoma caninum
Journal name Veterinary Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-4017
Publication date 2008-04-15
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.vetpar.2007.12.020
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 152
Issue 3-4
Start page 284
End page 293
Total pages 10
Editor L. Mansfield
C. Genchi
M. A. Taylor
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject C1
070708 Veterinary Parasitology
970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Abstract Resistance of the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum to anthelmintic therapy with pyrantel is an emerging problem in canine veterinary practice. Detecting anthelmintic resistance in parasites of pets is problematic because traditional resistance-monitoring techniques used with livestock parasites, such as the faecal egg count reduction test, are often impractical for use in small animals. We used two field-collected isolates of A. caninum in an abbreviated critical trial to test their pyrantel resistance status. The strains showed high-level and low-level resistance, with in vivo pyrantel efficacies of 28% and 71%, respectively. We noted a distinct worm density dependence effect on faecal egg count during the critical trial; egg counts in the dogs containing the low-level resistant isolate were 41% higher 6 days after drug treatment, despite the removal of 71% of the adult worms by the drug treatment. We then assessed four candidate in vitro assays for their ability to detect pyrantel resistance in A. caninum larvae, using these two isolates. The assays included a new format termed the larval arrested morphology assay (LAMA), based on observation of the effects of pyrantel on the body shape adopted by infective stage A. caninum larvae in vitro. Our data suggests that three of these assays, the LAMA, the larval motility assay (LMA), and larval feeding inhibition assay (LFIA) show promise with regards to detection of pyrantel resistance in A. caninum, but the complexity of the LFIA would likely limit its suitability for field studies. In vivo pyrantel efficacies of 28% and 71% in the two A. caninum isolates were associated with a 17-fold shift in the in vitro IC50 values measured using the LAMA. Further testing with isolates of varying degrees of resistance is required to determine which of these assays is suitable as a rapid in vitro laboratory test for pyrantel resistance in A. caninum. The present study also indicates that potential exists for the novel LAMA or the LMA to be of use in detecting pyrantel resistance in the human hookworms, Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale.
Keyword Pyrantel
Hookworm
Assay
Resistance
Detection
A. caninum
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 01:53:00 EST by Narelle Poole on behalf of School of Veterinary Science