Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings

T L Mader, L J Johnson, T M Brown-Brandl and J B Gaughan (2008). Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings. In: Lawrence P Reynolds and Jean Rice, Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium. International Livestock Environment Symposium, Iguassu Falls, Brazil, (395-402). 31.08.08 to 04.09.08.

Author T L Mader
L J Johnson
T M Brown-Brandl
J B Gaughan
Title of paper Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings
Conference name International Livestock Environment Symposium
Conference location Iguassu Falls, Brazil
Conference dates 31.08.08 to 04.09.08
Proceedings title Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium   Check publisher's open access policy
Series Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium
Place of Publication Michigan, USA
Publisher American Society of Animal Science
Publication Year 2008
Year available 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9781892769688
ISSN 0021-8812
1525-3163
Editor Lawrence P Reynolds
Jean Rice
Volume VIII
Start page 395
End page 402
Total pages 8
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Confinement buildings are utilized for finishing cattle to allow more efficient collection of animal waste and to buffer animals against adverse climatic conditions. Environmental data were obtained from a 29 m wide × 318 m long, solid floor, bedded confinement building with the long axis oriented east to west. The south side (front) was approximately 8.5 m high and the north (back) side is approximately 5.0 m high with 3.7 m being open (at the top). The opening was closed to within 1.0 m of the top in the winter. In general, low wind speed and/or decreased air movement associated with the building tends to allow for greater relative humidity (RH) especially at the front of the building (south facing) in the summer and winter. The use of the buildings did not lessen heat stress in the summer, as measured by the temperature humidity index (TH1) but acted as a shade to decrease the solar heat load on the animal. During the summer season, temperatures were generally greatest at the front of the building. However, in the winter, 2 to 4×1 greater temperatures were maintained in the building when compared to outside conditions, by decreasing air flow through the building and from heat generated by the cattle. Bedded barn facilities appear to be useful for buffering cattle against the adverse effects of the environment under hot and cold conditions even though less airflow and greater RH can be found inside the barn when compared to outside conditions.
Subjects 070203 Animal Management
839901 Animal Welfare
EX
Keyword Beef Cattle
Building
Feedlot
Season
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Sub-type: Fully published paper
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Fri, 03 Apr 2009, 00:57:10 EST by Mrs Kathy Bachmann on behalf of School of Animal Studies