Media bias during extreme intergroup conflict: The naming bias in reports of religious violence in Indonesia

Ariyanto, Amarina, Hornsey, Matthew J., Morton, Thomas A. and Gallois, Cindy (2008) Media bias during extreme intergroup conflict: The naming bias in reports of religious violence in Indonesia. Asian Journal of Communication, 18 1: 16-31. doi:10.1080/01292980701823740

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Author Ariyanto, Amarina
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Morton, Thomas A.
Gallois, Cindy
Title Media bias during extreme intergroup conflict: The naming bias in reports of religious violence in Indonesia
Journal name Asian Journal of Communication   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0129-2986
1742-0911
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01292980701823740
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 1
Start page 16
End page 31
Total pages 16
Editor Eddie C. Y. Kuo
Place of publication Singapore, Republic of Singapore
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject C1
170113 Social and Community Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Although the media are regularly charged with bias, empirical evidence of media bias is variable. The aim of the current research was to explore the utility of an intergroup perspective to understanding media bias as it emerges in the context of intergroup conflict. Content analysis was conducted on accounts of ongoing Christian-Muslim conflict in Ambon, Indonesia, as reported in both Christian and Muslim newspapers. This revealed the operation of a 'naming bias', whereby both Christian and Muslim newspapers were more likely to explicitly name the religious outgroup as perpetrators of intergroup conflict than they were to attribute responsibility to their own group. The prevalence of this bias was, however, asymmetrical across the two groups: it was pronounced in the Muslim newspaper but minimised in the Christian one. This pattern was evident in a general sample of media reports, and in a sample of matched reports in which the same incident was covered by both papers. The naming bias and its variable operation is explained with reference to social psychological theorising about intergroup dynamics.
Keyword Media bias
Intergroup relations
Religious conflict
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 03:56:43 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences