The effects of aphasia severity on the ability to assess language disorders via telerehabilitation

Hill, Anne J., Theodoros, Deborah G., Russell, Trevor G., Ward, Elizabeth C. and Wootton, Richard (2009) The effects of aphasia severity on the ability to assess language disorders via telerehabilitation. Aphasiology, 23 5: 627-642. doi:10.1080/02687030801909659


Author Hill, Anne J.
Theodoros, Deborah G.
Russell, Trevor G.
Ward, Elizabeth C.
Wootton, Richard
Title The effects of aphasia severity on the ability to assess language disorders via telerehabilitation
Journal name Aphasiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-7038
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02687030801909659
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 5
Start page 627
End page 642
Total pages 16
Editor R, Marshall
C. Code
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Language eng
Subject C1
920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
Abstract Background: Telerehabilitation is the remote delivery of rehabilitation services via information technology and telecommunication systems. There have been a number of recent studies that have used video conferencing to assess language skills in people with aphasia. These studies have highlighted the possibility that severity of impairment and aetiology may have an effect on the administration of telerehabilitation language assessment protocols. Furthermore, anecdotal accounts of difficulties in administering language assessment via telerehabilitation also demonstrate the need for research into the effects of severity of aphasia. It is important that the effects of severity of aphasia are determined as part of the overall evidence base for telerehabilitation language assessment protocols. Aims: To investigate the influence of severity of aphasia on the ability to assess acquired aphasia via telerehabilitation methods. Methods Procedures: A total of 32 participants with an acquired aphasia were assessed simultaneously via telerehabilitation and face-to-face methods on the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination 3rd Edition Short Form (BDAE-3) and the Boston Naming Test (BNT) (2nd Edition Short Form). A custom-built telerehabilitation system developed at the University of Queensland enabled real-time telerehabilitation assessment over a 128kbit/s Internet connection. Participants were grouped according to their severity level. Data analysis was conducted on the differences in scores from the two assessors. Outcomes Results: Results revealed that severity of aphasia did not greatly influence the accuracy of the telerehabilitation assessment for the majority of the BDAE-3 clusters. However, severity of aphasia appeared to affect the ability to assess naming and paraphasia via telerehabilitation methods. Post-hoc analysis revealed that the scores given in the face-to-face and telerehabilitation environments were comparable within each severity level. Conclusions: Results suggest that severity of aphasia may influence the ability to assess some language parameters via telerehabilitation. Further research should use larger sample sizes to confirm these results and to refine the telerehabilitation technology to enable these parameters to be adequately assessed. Additionally, clinician satisfaction with telerehabilitation assessment should be qualitatively researched so as to widen clinician acceptance of this method.
Formatted abstract
Background: Telerehabilitation is the remote delivery of rehabilitation services via information technology and telecommunication systems. There have been a number of recent studies that have used video conferencing to assess language skills in people with aphasia. These studies have highlighted the possibility that severity of impairment and aetiology may have an effect on the administration of telerehabilitation language assessment protocols. Furthermore, anecdotal accounts of difficulties in administering language assessment via telerehabilitation also demonstrate the need for research into the effects of severity of aphasia. It is important that the effects of severity of aphasia are determined as part of the overall evidence base for telerehabilitation language assessment protocols.

Aims:
To investigate the influence of severity of aphasia on the ability to assess acquired aphasia via telerehabilitation methods.

Methods & Procedures:
A total of 32 participants with an acquired aphasia were assessed simultaneously via telerehabilitation and face-to-face methods on the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination 3rd Edition Short Form (BDAE-3) and the Boston Naming Test (BNT) (2nd Edition Short Form). A custom-built telerehabilitation system developed at the University of Queensland enabled real-time telerehabilitation assessment over a 128 kbit/s Internet connection. Participants were grouped according to their severity level. Data analysis was conducted on the differences in scores from the two assessors.

Outcomes & Results:
Results revealed that severity of aphasia did not greatly influence the accuracy of the telerehabilitation assessment for the majority of the BDAE-3 clusters. However, severity of aphasia appeared to affect the ability to assess naming and paraphasia via telerehabilitation methods. Post-hoc analysis revealed that the scores given in the face-to-face and telerehabilitation environments were comparable within each severity level.

Conclusions: Results suggest that severity of aphasia may influence the ability to assess some language parameters via telerehabilitation. Further research should use larger sample sizes to confirm these results and to refine the telerehabilitation technology to enable these parameters to be adequately assessed. Additionally, clinician satisfaction with telerehabilitation assessment should be qualitatively researched so as to widen clinician acceptance of this method.
* The authors gratefully acknowledge funding support for this study from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Project Grant No. 401604 and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Public Health Postgraduate Scholarship ID 351649. The authors also acknowledge the assistance of Roy Anderson for software development of the telerehabilitation application, and Monique Waite for data collection. We acknowledge the assistance of the Princess Alexandra Hospital, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital, The University of Queensland Health and Rehabilitation Clinics, and the Aphasia Registry in the recruitment of participants for this study. Finally, the authors wish to acknowledge the participants of this study for the generous gift of their time.
Keyword Telerehabilitation
Aphasia
Assessment
Severity
Language
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 401604
ID 351649
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 01:42:51 EST by Kathleen Reinhardt on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences