Organic potassium salts or fibers effects on mineral balance and digestive fermentations in rats adapted to an acidogenic diet

Sabboh, Houda, Besson, Catherine, Tressol, Jean-Claude, Coudray, Charles, Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle, Coxam, Véronique, Rémésy, Christian and Demigné, Christian (2006) Organic potassium salts or fibers effects on mineral balance and digestive fermentations in rats adapted to an acidogenic diet. European journal of nutrition, 45 6: 342-348. doi:10.1007/s00394-006-0604-0


Author Sabboh, Houda
Besson, Catherine
Tressol, Jean-Claude
Coudray, Charles
Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle
Coxam, Véronique
Rémésy, Christian
Demigné, Christian
Title Organic potassium salts or fibers effects on mineral balance and digestive fermentations in rats adapted to an acidogenic diet
Journal name European journal of nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1436-6207
Publication date 2006-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00394-006-0604-0
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 6
Start page 342
End page 348
Total pages 7
Place of publication Darmstadt, Germany
Publisher Steinkopff
Language eng
Subject 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Abstract Background Fibers and potassium (K) organic salts in plant foods are liable to affect Ca and Mg balance at digestive and renal levels, respectively. K organic salts could counteract the acidifying effects of western diets and consequences of excess NaCl. Aim of the study To study this question, male rats were adapted to a basal acidifying low-K (LK) diet, or to diets supplemented with a fiber mix (LK/F), or K citrate (HK) or both (HK/F). Results HK and HK/F diets displayed a marked alkalinizing effect in urine and promoted citraturia, but this effect was not modulated by fibers. The effect of fibers on Ca digestive absorption was more potent than K citrate effect on Ca renal excretion. In contrast, K citrate effect on kidney Mg excretion was more effective than that of fibers on Mg digestive absorption, a maximal effect on Mg balance was observed in rats fed the HK/F diet. Digestive fermentations in rats fed the LK/F diet were characterized by high-propionic acid fermentations and succinate accumulation. In rats adapted to the HK/F diet, K citrate supplementation depressed succinate and increased butyrate concentrations. Conclusion Organic anions arising from digestive fermentations seem to be not directly involved in the alkalinizing effects of plant foods. Fibers and organic K salts exert distinct effects on Ca and Mg metabolism, but with interesting interactions as to Mg balance, digestive fermentations and urine pH.
Keyword fibers
organic anions
potassium
fermentation
acid–base balance
magnesium
calcium
rat
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 01:41:56 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences