Mice chronically fed a westernized experimental diet as a model of obesity, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis

Demigné, Christian, Bloch-Faure, May, Picard, Nicolas, Sabboh, Houda, Besson, Catherine, Rémésy, Christian, Geoffroy, Valérie, Gaston, Anh-Thu, Nicoletti, Antonino, Hagège, Albert, Ménard, Joël and Meneton, Pierre (2006) Mice chronically fed a westernized experimental diet as a model of obesity, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. European journal of nutrition, 45 5: 298-306. doi:10.1007/s00394-006-0599-6


Author Demigné, Christian
Bloch-Faure, May
Picard, Nicolas
Sabboh, Houda
Besson, Catherine
Rémésy, Christian
Geoffroy, Valérie
Gaston, Anh-Thu
Nicoletti, Antonino
Hagège, Albert
Ménard, Joël
Meneton, Pierre
Title Mice chronically fed a westernized experimental diet as a model of obesity, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis
Journal name European journal of nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1436-6207
Publication date 2006-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00394-006-0599-6
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 5
Start page 298
End page 306
Total pages 9
Place of publication Darmstadt, Germany
Publisher Steinkopff
Language eng
Subject 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Abstract Background Most studies in animals use diets with several features (for example low-fat, rich in micronutriments), likely to be strongly protective against chronic diseases. Aim of the study The present study, performed in wild type outbred mice, was designed to evaluate the validity of a model of ‘westernized’ (W) diet reproducing, as closely as possible, the overall composition of an average human regime in western countries Results In contrast to the standard (S) diet, the W diet triggered a marked increase in adiposity with some characteristics of metabolic syndrome (hypercholesterolemia, hyperinsulinemia...). There was an heterogeneity in the propensity to become obese upon exposure to the W diet in female mice. Overweight mice also presented some disturbances of renal function, such as hyperalbuminuria and hypocitraturia. Mice adapted to the W diet showed a reduction of bone mineral density, especially the non-obese ones. Conclusion These data suggest that a model of westernized diet could be appropriate for exploring the effects of mutations, drugs, or specific nutritional factors in animals and could be more relevant for human situations.
Keyword mice
westernized diet
metabolic syndrome
bone mineral density
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 01:08:10 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences