Long term health complaints following the Amsterdam Air Disaster in police officers and fire-fighters

Huizink, A. C., Slottje, P., Witteveen, A. B., Bijlsma, J. A., Twisk, J. W. R., Smidt, N., Bramsen, I., van Mechelen, W., van der Ploeg, H. M., Bouter, L. M. and Smid, T. (2006) Long term health complaints following the Amsterdam Air Disaster in police officers and fire-fighters. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 63 10: 657-662. doi:10.1136/oem.2005.024687


Author Huizink, A. C.
Slottje, P.
Witteveen, A. B.
Bijlsma, J. A.
Twisk, J. W. R.
Smidt, N.
Bramsen, I.
van Mechelen, W.
van der Ploeg, H. M.
Bouter, L. M.
Smid, T.
Title Long term health complaints following the Amsterdam Air Disaster in police officers and fire-fighters
Journal name Occupational and Environmental Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1351-0711
Publication date 2006-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/oem.2005.024687
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 63
Issue 10
Start page 657
End page 662
Total pages 6
Place of publication London
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Abstract Background: On 4 October 1992, a cargo aircraft crashed into apartment buildings in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Fire-fighters and police officers assisted with the rescue work. Objectives: To examine the long term health complaints in rescue workers exposed to a disaster. Methods: A historical cohort study was performed among police officers (n = 834) and fire-fighters (n = 334) who performed at least one disaster related task and reference groups of their non-exposed colleagues (n = 634 and n = 194, respectively). The main outcome measures included digestive, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous system, airway, skin, post-traumatic stress, fatigue, and general mental health complaints; haematological and biochemical laboratory values; and urinalysis outcomes. Results: Police officers and fire-fighters who were professionally exposed to a disaster reported more physical and mental health complaints, compared to the reference groups. No clinically relevant statistically significant differences in laboratory outcomes were found. Conclusions: This study is the first to examine long term health complaints in a large sample of rescue workers exposed to a disaster in comparison to reference groups of non-exposed colleagues. Findings show that even in the long term, and in the absence of laboratory abnormalities, rescue workers report more health complaints.
Keyword health effects
long-term
disaster
rescue workers
ESADA
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 00:36:32 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences