Early overweight and pubertal maturation—pathways of association with young adults' overweight: A longitudinal study

Mamun, A. A., Hayatbakhsh, M. R., O'Callaghan, M., Williams, G. and Najman, J. (2009) Early overweight and pubertal maturation—pathways of association with young adults' overweight: A longitudinal study. International Journal of Obesity, 33 1: 14-20. doi:10.1038/ijo.2008.220

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Author Mamun, A. A.
Hayatbakhsh, M. R.
O'Callaghan, M.
Williams, G.
Najman, J.
Title Early overweight and pubertal maturation—pathways of association with young adults' overweight: A longitudinal study
Journal name International Journal of Obesity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0307-0565
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2008.220
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 33
Issue 1
Start page 14
End page 20
Total pages 7
Editor Richard L. Atkinson
Ian Macdonald
Place of publication Stockton, England
Publisher Macmillan
Language eng
Subject C1
111706 Epidemiology
111704 Community Child Health
920401 Behaviour and Health
Abstract Objective: Objectives of this study were to examine the prospective association of childhood body mass index (BMI) and overweight and pubertal stages with BMI and overweight in early adulthood independent of each other.
Formatted abstract
Objective: Objectives of this study were to examine the prospective association of childhood body mass index (BMI) and overweight and pubertal stages with BMI and overweight in early adulthood independent of each other.

Design: A population-based prospective birth cohort.

Subjects: We used a population-based prospective birth cohort of 2897 (52% men) young adults who were born during 1981–1983 in Brisbane, Australia, and for whom we had puberty stages using Tanner scale at 14 years and measured BMI at 5 years of age.

Main outcome measures: Pubertal stages at adolescent and BMI and its categories at 21 years.

Results
: We found that increasing BMI and overweight at 5 years of age predict the advanced stages of puberty. An advanced stage of puberty predicts young adults' BMI and overweight status at 21 years. When taking both childhood BMI and pubertal status into consideration, we found that being overweight at 5 years substantively increases BMI at 21 years, regardless of the stage of puberty reported at 14 years. We also found that subjects with normal BMI at 5 years but with higher stages of puberty at 14 years had threefolds greater risk to be overweight at 21 years compared with their counterparts. All associations remained consistent after controlling for potential confounders.

Conclusions: Although this study underscores the impact of both child overweight and pubertal development on young adults' obesity, the mechanism that further explainsthe impact of puberty needs to be identified.
Keyword overweight
body mass index
puberty
childhood and adolescence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 519756
2007001895
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 02 Apr 2009, 00:32:42 EST by Yvonne Flanagan on behalf of School of Public Health