Birth weight and stages of CKD: A case-control study in an Australian population

Al Salmi, Isa, Hoy, Wendy E., Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas, Wang, Zhiqiang, Healy, Helen and Shaw, Jonathan E. (2008) Birth weight and stages of CKD: A case-control study in an Australian population. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 52 6: 1070-1078. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2008.04.028


Author Al Salmi, Isa
Hoy, Wendy E.
Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas
Wang, Zhiqiang
Healy, Helen
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Title Birth weight and stages of CKD: A case-control study in an Australian population
Journal name American Journal of Kidney Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0272-6386
1523-6838
Publication date 2008-12-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1053/j.ajkd.2008.04.028
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 52
Issue 6
Start page 1070
End page 1078
Total pages 9
Place of publication Philadelphia, U. S. A.
Publisher W. B. Saunders
Language eng
Subject C1
111706 Epidemiology
920119 Urogenital System and Disorders
1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract Background: In view of recent reports of the relationship of kidney disease to birth weight, we evaluate the relationship between birth weight and chronic kidney disease (CKD), including end-stage kidney disease, in Australian adults.
Formatted abstract
Background:
In view of recent reports of the relationship of kidney disease to birth weight, we evaluate the relationship between birth weight and chronic kidney disease (CKD), including end-stage kidney disease, in Australian adults.

Study Design:
A case-control study.

Setting & Participants:
Patients attending the nephrology department at a major metropolitan hospital in Australia were asked to recall their birth weight, excluding those with structural kidney abnormalities. Two controls for each patient, matched for sex and within 5 years of age, were selected from participants from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) Study, who had also been asked to report their birth weight.

Predictor:
Birth weight in kilograms.

Outcomes & Measurements:
CKD and stages were defined using the National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative classification, proteinuria as a marker of kidney damage, and glomerular filtration rate estimates, by using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation.

Results:
Of 189 patients with CKD who reported their birth weights for whom controls were identified, 106 were men. Mean age was 60.3 ± 15 (SD) years. Mean birth weight overall was 3.27 ± 0.6 versus 3.46 ± 0.6 kg for their controls (P < 0.001), and proportions with birth weights less than 2.5 kg were 12.2% and 4.4% (P < 0.001). In patients with CKD, 22.8%, 21.7%, 18%, and 37.6% were in CKD stages 2 (n = 43), 3 (n = 41), 4 (n = 34), and 5 (n = 71), respectively. Birth weights by CKD stage and their AusDiab controls were as follows: stage 2, 3.38 ± 0.52 versus 3.49 ± 0.52 kg; P = 0.2; stage 3, 3.28 ± 0.54 versus 3.44 ± 0.54 kg; P = 0.1; stage 4, 3.19 ± 0.72 versus 3.43 ± 0.56 kg; P = 0.1; and stage 5, 3.09 ± 0.65 versus 3.47 ± 0.67 kg; P < 0.001. Differences in birth weights applied to women and men and people younger than 60 and 60 years and older and were present in the major “causal” categories of renal disease.

Limitations: Birth weight is by self-recall with a significant nonresponse rate to the questionnaire in both cases and controls.

Conclusions
: Urban Australian patients with CKD had lower birth weights than their matched Australian controls. In addition, the more advanced the CKD stage, the lower the birth weight. Thus, lower birth weights appear to predispose to CKD and to its progression. Among possible explanations is the documented association between birth weight and nephron number.
© 2008 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

Keyword Birth weight
Chronic kidney disease
Epidemiology
End-stage kidney disease
Glomerular filtration rate
Modification of diet in renal disease
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 23:45:52 EST by Amy Wong on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital