Increasing intensity during treadmill walking does not adversely affect walking pattern or quality in newly-ambulatory stroke patients: An experimental study.

Kuys, S., Brauer, S. G., Ada, L. and Russell, T. (2008) Increasing intensity during treadmill walking does not adversely affect walking pattern or quality in newly-ambulatory stroke patients: An experimental study.. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 54 1: 49-54. doi:10.1016/S0004-9514(08)70066-7


Author Kuys, S.
Brauer, S. G.
Ada, L.
Russell, T.
Title Increasing intensity during treadmill walking does not adversely affect walking pattern or quality in newly-ambulatory stroke patients: An experimental study.
Journal name Australian Journal of Physiotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9514
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(08)70066-7
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 54
Issue 1
Start page 49
End page 54
Total pages 6
Editor Ada, L.
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Australian Physiotherapy Association
Language eng
Subject C1
920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
110317 Physiotherapy
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases)
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract Question: Does walking on a treadmill at increasing intensities adversely affect walking pattern or reduce walking quality during treadmill walking? Are any changes influenced by walking ability? Design: A with in-participant, repeated measures experimental study. Participants: 18 individuals with a first stroke who were undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Intervention: Walking on a treadmill at intensities of 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% heart rate reserve in the one session. Outcome measures: During treadmill walking practice, walking pattern was measured as linear and angular kinematics while walking quality was measured using the Rivermead Gait Analysis scale and a visual analogue scale. Results: Walking on the treadmill at 60% heart rate reserve, step length of the paretic limb was 0.05 m (95% CI 0.01 to 0.10) longer, step length of the non-paretic limb was 0.09 m (95% CI 0.05 to 0.12) longer, and hip flexion at mid swing was 4 degrees (95% CI to 6) greater than at 30% heart rate reserve. At 60% heart rate reserve, hip and knee extension at mid stance were respectively 3 and 4 degrees more flexed than at 30% heart rate reserve. Walking ability did not affect changes in walking pattern. Walking quality did not change with increasing treadmill intensity. Conclusion: Walking on a treadmill at increasing intensity did not adversely affect walking pattern or reduce walking quality in newly-ambulating stroke patients. This study adds some support for the inclusion of walking on a treadmill at higher intensities in rehabilitation for newly-ambulating stroke patients.
Formatted abstract
 Question: Does walking on a treadmill at increasing intensities adversely affect walking pattern or reduce walking quality during treadmill walking? Are any changes influenced by walking ability? Design: A within-participant, repeated measures experimental study. Participants: 18 individuals with a first stroke who were undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Intervention: Walking on a treadmill at intensities of 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% heart rate reserve in the one session. Outcome measures: During treadmill walking practice, walking pattern was measured as linear and angular kinematics while walking quality was measured using the Rivermead Gait Analysis scale and a visual analogue scale. Results: Walking on the treadmill at 60% heart rate reserve, step length of the paretic limb was 0.05 m (95% CI 0.01 to 0.10) longer, step length of the non-paretic limb was 0.09 m (95% CI 0.05 to 0.12) longer, and hip flexion at mid swing was 4 degrees (95% CI 1 to 6) greater than at 30% heart rate reserve. At 60% heart rate reserve, hip and knee extension at mid stance were respectively 3 and 4 degrees more flexed than at 30% heart rate reserve. Walking ability did not affect changes in walking pattern. Walking quality did not change with increasing treadmill intensity. Conclusion: Walking on a treadmill at increasing intensity did not adversely affect walking pattern or reduce walking quality in newly-ambulating stroke patients. This study adds some support for the inclusion of walking on a treadmill at higher intensities in rehabilitation for newly-ambulating stroke patients. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Keyword Clinical studies
Rehabilitation Outcomes
Treadmill walking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 23:08:38 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences