Thinking Outside the (Voice)Box: A Case Study of Students' Perceptions of the Relevance of Anatomy to Speech Pathology

Weir, Kristy A. (2008) Thinking Outside the (Voice)Box: A Case Study of Students' Perceptions of the Relevance of Anatomy to Speech Pathology. Anatomical Sciences Education, 1 4: 166-174. doi:10.1002/ase.34


Author Weir, Kristy A.
Title Thinking Outside the (Voice)Box: A Case Study of Students' Perceptions of the Relevance of Anatomy to Speech Pathology
Journal name Anatomical Sciences Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1935-9772
Publication date 2008-07-14
Year available 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1002/ase.34
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 1
Issue 4
Start page 166
End page 174
Total pages 9
Editor R. Drake
W. Pawlina
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J., U.S.A.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Language eng
Subject C1
130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
920107 Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
Abstract Speech pathology students readily identify the importance of a sound understanding of anatomical structures central to their intended profession. In contrast, they often do not recognize the relevance of a broader understanding of structure and function. This study aimed to explore students' perceptions of the relevance of anatomy to speech pathology. The effect of two learning activities on students' perceptions was also evaluated. First, a written assignment required students to illustrate the relevance of anatomy to speech pathology by using an example selected from one of the four alternative structures. The second approach was the introduction of brief scenarios with directed questions into the practical class. The effects of these activities were assessed via two surveys designed to evaluate students' perceptions of the relevance of anatomy before and during the course experience. A focus group was conducted to clarify and extend discussion of issues arising from the survey data. The results showed that the students perceived some course material as irrelevant to speech pathology. The importance of relevance to the students' state motivation was well supported by the data. Although the students believed that the learning activities helped their understanding of the relevance of anatomy, some structures were considered less relevant at the end of the course. It is likely that the perceived amount of content and surface approach to learning may have prevented students from thinking outside the box regarding which anatomical structures are relevant to the profession. Anat Sci Ed 2008. © 2008 American Association of Anatomists.
Keyword Higher education
motivation
Surface/deep approaches to learning
Anatomy education
Speech-language pathology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 20:58:17 EST by Shirley Rey on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences