Modern performing arts as a reflection of changing Balinese identity

Putra, I Nyoman Darma (2008) Modern performing arts as a reflection of changing Balinese identity. Indonesia and the Malay World, 36 104: 87-114. doi:10.1080/13639810802017842

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Author Putra, I Nyoman Darma
Title Modern performing arts as a reflection of changing Balinese identity
Journal name Indonesia and the Malay World   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1363-9811
1469-8382
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13639810802017842
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 36
Issue 104
Start page 87
End page 114
Total pages 28
Editor Khng, P.
Murtagh, B.
Place of publication Abingdon, UK
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject C1
200202 Asian Cultural Studies
950105 The Performing Arts (incl. Theatre and Dance)
Abstract Scholarly studies on the performing arts in Bali have been heavily focused on traditional dance and drama. Modern theatre therefore has not only become a neglected subject but is treated as though it is non-existent. This study focuses on the development of modern performing arts in Bali from the late 19th century until the 1960s. It begins with the arrival of the popular Malay theatre styles, stambul and later tonil, from Java, and describes the nature and impact of these two styles on Bali. It then proceeds to show how they were changed into sandiwara during the Japanese occupation and the period following independence, when western-style theatre was also introduced. The final theatre form discussed is drama gong, created in the late 1950s and achieving great popularity in succeeding decades. It discusses how these modern performing arts act as a barometer of changing ideas of Balinese identity, particularly in regard to drama gong which was considered modern when initially performed in Indonesian, but was then regarded as a 'traditional' form when performed in Balinese as a reflection of an increasing sense of regional identity.
Formatted abstract
Scholarly studies on the performing arts in Bali have been heavily focused on traditional dance and drama. Modern theatre therefore has not only become a neglected subject but is treated as though it is non-existent. This study focuses on the development of modern performing arts in Bali from the late 19th century until the 1960s. It begins with the arrival of the popular Malay theatre styles, stambul and later tonil, from Java, and describes the nature and impact of these two styles on Bali. It then proceeds to show how they were changed into sandiwara during the Japanese occupation and the period following independence, when western-style theatre was also introduced. The final theatre form discussed is drama gong, created in the late 1950s and achieving great popularity in succeeding decades. It discusses how these modern performing arts act as a barometer of changing ideas of Balinese identity, particularly in regard to drama gong which was considered modern when initially performed in Indonesian, but was then regarded as a 'traditional' form when performed in Balinese as a reflection of an increasing sense of regional identity.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 02:46:51 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures