In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) fermentation in pigs: Fermentable substrates and microbial activity

Williams, Barbara A., Bosch, Marlou W., Awati, Ajay, Konstantinov, Sergey R., Smidt, Hauke, Akkermans, Antoon D. L., Verstegen, Martin W. A. and Tamminga, Seerp (2005) In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) fermentation in pigs: Fermentable substrates and microbial activity. Animal Research, 54 3: 191-201. doi:10.1051/animres:2005011

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Author Williams, Barbara A.
Bosch, Marlou W.
Awati, Ajay
Konstantinov, Sergey R.
Smidt, Hauke
Akkermans, Antoon D. L.
Verstegen, Martin W. A.
Tamminga, Seerp
Title In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) fermentation in pigs: Fermentable substrates and microbial activity
Journal name Animal Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1627-3583
1627-3591
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1051/animres:2005011
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 54
Issue 3
Start page 191
End page 201
Total pages 11
Editor Michel Doreau
Publisher INRA, EDP Sciences
Language eng
Subject 070204 Animal Nutrition
Abstract Recently, it has become apparent that GIT fermentation is not only of interest for ruminant animals, but also for monogastrics. While it is now widely accepted that the fermentation process and its resultant end-products can have important influences on animal health, little is known about the microbiological and immunological processes involved. In terms of animal health, most interest at the moment is focussed on those moments in animals’ lives when they are faced with sudden changes resulting in stress. The period of weaning in piglets is a typical example of this. The most easily accomplished and appropriate way to influence GIT fermentation processes is that of dietary intervention. This is reflected by the widespread interest in so-called pre- and pro-biotics. Given the complexities of the interactions occurring in the animal itself, it is hardly surprising that in vitro techniques are being widely used: firstly to examine potential substrates for their fermentability and possible inclusion in diets, and secondly, to assess changes in the microbial populations in response to these substrates. This paper will review the techniques currently in use for these two aspects of monogastric fermentation, and provide examples of their use.
Keyword Gastro-intestinal tract
Fermentation
In vitro
Microbial activity
Prebiotic
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 01:08:38 EST by Ms Sarada Rao on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences