Nebulized Lidocaine Decreases the Discomfort of Nasogastric Tube Insertion: a randomized, Double-blind Trial

Cullen, Louise, Taylor, David, Taylor, Simone and Chu, Kevin (2004) Nebulized Lidocaine Decreases the Discomfort of Nasogastric Tube Insertion: a randomized, Double-blind Trial. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 44 2: 131-137. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.03.033


Author Cullen, Louise
Taylor, David
Taylor, Simone
Chu, Kevin
Title Nebulized Lidocaine Decreases the Discomfort of Nasogastric Tube Insertion: a randomized, Double-blind Trial
Journal name Annals of Emergency Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0196-0644
Publication date 2004-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2004.03.033
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 2
Start page 131
End page 137
Total pages 7
Place of publication St Louis, MO.
Publisher Mosby
Language eng
Subject 110305 Emergency Medicine
Abstract Study objective Nasogastric tube insertion is a common emergency department (ED) procedure that is associated with considerable patient discomfort. The safety and efficacy of nebulized lidocaine for upper airway anesthesia have previously been demonstrated. We determine whether nebulized lidocaine administered before nasogastric tube insertion significantly reduces patient discomfort. Methods A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of adult patients was conducted in the EDs of 2 university hospitals. Twenty-nine participants were administered nebulized lidocaine (4 mL 10%), and 21 participants received nebulized normal saline solution. Patient discomfort was measured using a 100-mm visual analog scale. The difficulty of nasogastric tube insertion was evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. Results There was a clinical and statistical significant difference in patient discomfort associated with the passage of the nasogastric tube between nebulized lidocaine and placebo groups (mean visual analog scale score 37.7 versus 59.3 mm, respectively; difference between group means 21.6 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.3 to 38.0 mm). There was not a detectable difference in difficulty with the passage of the nasogastric tube between the 2 groups (median 2 versus 2; median difference 0; 95% CI −1 to 1). Epistaxis occurred more frequently in the lidocaine group (17% versus 0%; difference 17%; 95% CI 3.5% to 31%). Conclusion Nebulized lidocaine decreases the discomfort of nasogastric tube insertion and should be considered before passing a nasogastric tube. An increased frequency of epistaxis, however, may be associated with its use.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 01:08:19 EST by Juliette Grosvenor on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital