Black cohosh and other herbal remedies associated with acute hepatitis [Letter to the Editor]

Vitetta, Luis, Thomsen, Michael and Sali, Avni (2003) Black cohosh and other herbal remedies associated with acute hepatitis [Letter to the Editor]. Medical Journal Australia, 178 8: 411-412.


Author Vitetta, Luis
Thomsen, Michael
Sali, Avni
Title Black cohosh and other herbal remedies associated with acute hepatitis [Letter to the Editor]
Journal name Medical Journal Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 178
Issue 8
Start page 411
End page 412
Total pages 2
Place of publication Sydney
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Co
Language eng
Subject 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Abstract To the Editor: We wish to comment on the article by Whiting and colleagues1 on the proposed causal relationship between herbal remedies and severe acute hepatitis. Investigators have found that reported adverse effects of herbal medicines are not, in fact, caused by herbs alleged to be in the product, but result from substitution or contamination of the declared ingredients, intentionally or by accident, with a more toxic herb, a poisonous metal or even a pharmaceutical compound. In reports of adverse effects, there is often no effort to establish a positive identification of the herb involved or any adulterants. The attribution of toxicity to the wrong plant leads to inaccurate information being provided to patients, practitioners and regulators.4 A significant problem is the use of common names. As mentioned by Whiting and colleagues,1 Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) has at least 20 different common names, which can be very confusing. The most tragic example of such confusion is the fatal substitution of Stephania tetrandra by the toxic herb Aristolochia fangchi owing to the similarity of the common names of the two herbs.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2009, 00:08:43 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences