Effects of plant food potassium salts (citrate galacturonate or tartrate) on acid–base status and digestive fermentations in rats

Sabboh, Houda, Coxam, Véronique, Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle, Rémésy, Christian and Demigné, Christian (2007) Effects of plant food potassium salts (citrate galacturonate or tartrate) on acid–base status and digestive fermentations in rats. British Journal of Nutrition, 98 1: 72-77. doi:10.1017/S0007114507701691

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ172939_OA.pdf application/pdf 134.36KB 0

Author Sabboh, Houda
Coxam, Véronique
Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle
Rémésy, Christian
Demigné, Christian
Title Effects of plant food potassium salts (citrate galacturonate or tartrate) on acid–base status and digestive fermentations in rats
Journal name British Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Publication date 2007-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0007114507701691
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 98
Issue 1
Start page 72
End page 77
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Abstract Potassium (K) organic anion salts, such as potassium citrate or potassium malate in plant foods, may counteract low-grade metabolic acidosis induced by western diets, but little is known about the effect of other minor plant anions. Effects of K salts (chloride, citrate, galacturonate or tartrate) were thus studied on the mineral balance and digestive fermentations in groups of 6-week-old rats adapted to an acidogenic/5 % inulin diet. In all diet groups, substantial amounts of lactate and succinate were present in the caecum, besides SCFA. SCFA were poorly affected by K salts conditions. The KCl-supplemented diet elicited an accumulation of lactate in the caecum; whereas the lactate caecal pool was low in rats fed the potassium tartrate-supplemented (K TAR) diet. A fraction of tartrate (around 50 %) was recovered in urine of rats fed the K TAR diet. Potassium citrate and potassium galacturonate diets exerted a marked alkalinizing effect on urine pH and promoted a notable citraturia (around 0·5 μmol/24 h). All the K organic anion salts counteracted Ca and Mg hyperexcretion in urine, especially potassium tartrate as to magnesuria. The present findings indicate that K salts of unabsorbed organic anions exert alkalinizing effects when metabolizable in the large intestine, even if K and finally available anions (likely SCFA) are not simultaneously bioavailable. Whether this observation is also relevant for a fraction of SCFA arising from dietary fibre breakdown (which represents the major organic anions absorbed in the digestive tract in man) deserves further investigation.
Keyword Potassium
Organic anions
Fermentation;
Acid–base balance
Calcium
Magnesium
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 23:49:00 EST by Ms Sarada Rao on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences