Virtual reality and acrophobia: One-year follow-up and case study

Coelho, Carlos M., Santos, Jorge A., Silvério, Jorge and Silva, Carlos F. (2006) Virtual reality and acrophobia: One-year follow-up and case study. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 9 3: 336-341. doi:10.1089/cpb.2006.9.336


Author Coelho, Carlos M.
Santos, Jorge A.
Silvério, Jorge
Silva, Carlos F.
Title Virtual reality and acrophobia: One-year follow-up and case study
Journal name CyberPsychology and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1094-9313
2152-2723
Publication date 2006-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/cpb.2006.9.336
Open Access Status
Volume 9
Issue 3
Start page 336
End page 341
Total pages 6
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY, United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert
Language eng
Subject 080111 Virtual Reality and Related Simulation
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
Abstract We present a study with 10 subjects being exposed to three sessions of simulated heights in a virtual reality (VR) system. Among the participants we highlight a 66-year-old man blind in his left eye. The participants show significant progress in anxiety, avoidance, and behavior measurements when confronted with real height circumstances. The results obtained 1 year later at follow-up are statistically significant in the Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT) and the Attitudes Toward Heights Questionnaire (ATHQ), but not the Acrophobia Questionnaire (AQ).
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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