Relationships between alcohol-related memory association and changes in mood: Systematic differences between high- and low-risk drinkers

Kelly, Adrian B. and Masternman, Paul W. (2008) Relationships between alcohol-related memory association and changes in mood: Systematic differences between high- and low-risk drinkers. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 43 5: 551-558. doi:10.1093/alcalc/agm174


Author Kelly, Adrian B.
Masternman, Paul W.
Title Relationships between alcohol-related memory association and changes in mood: Systematic differences between high- and low-risk drinkers
Journal name Alcohol and Alcoholism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0735-0414
Publication date 2008-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/alcalc/agm174
Open Access Status
Volume 43
Issue 5
Start page 551
End page 558
Total pages 8
Editor Jonathan D. Chick
P. De Witte
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920205 Health Education and Promotion
Abstract Heavy alcohol use is common in undergraduates and is associated with health-risk behaviors, negative consequences, and increased risk for future alcohol dependence. Alcohol-related memory associations (AMAs) and mood changes are independently related to student drinking, but more research on how these variables interact is needed. Aims: To examine (i) how AMAs predict drinking behavior after accounting for depression, and (ii) how changes in negative and positive mood predict AMAs among low- and high-risk drinkers. Methods: Positive and negative moods were manipulated using a musical mood induction procedure immediately prior to completion of memory association measures. A bootstrapped structural equation model was tested, permitting a sampling distribution free of the requirement of normality. Results: Negative mood changes predicted AMAs in high-risk drinkers but not in low-risk drinkers, and the opposite was found for positive mood changes. Conclusion: The negative mood-AMA association appeared relatedto risky drinking, and these subtle implicit cognitive processes may warrant a special focus in intervention programs for high-risk drinkers.
Formatted abstract
Heavy alcohol use is common in undergraduates and is associated with health-risk behaviors, negative consequences, and increased risk for future alcohol dependence. Alcohol-related memory associations (AMAs) and mood changes are independently related to student drinking, but more research on how these variables interact is needed.

Aims: To examine (i) how AMAs predict drinking behavior after accounting for depression, and (ii) how changes in negative and positive mood predict AMAs among low- and high-risk drinkers.

Methods: Positive and negative moods were manipulated using a musical mood induction procedure immediately prior to completion of memory association measures. A bootstrapped structural equation model was tested, permitting a sampling distribution free of the requirement of normality.

Results: Negative mood changes predicted AMAs in high-risk drinkers but not in low-risk drinkers, and the opposite was found for positive mood changes.

Conclusion: The negative mood-AMA association appeared related to risky drinking, and these subtle implicit cognitive processes may warrant a special focus in intervention programs for high-risk drinkers.
Keyword IMPLICIT COGNITION
EXPECTANCY STRENGTH
COLLEGE-STUDENTS
CUE REACTIVITY
YOUNG DRINKERS
DRUG OFFENDERS
MARIJUANA USE
SUBSTANCE USE
DRINKING
CONSUMPTION
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes originally published online on May 9, 2008. -- © The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Medical Council on Alcohol. All rights reserved

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 21:51:22 EST by Margaret Gately on behalf of School of Social Science