Antibody responses to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in predators, scavengers, and hares in New Zealand during epidemics in sympatric rabbit populations

Parkes, J., Heyward, R. P., Henning, J. and Motha, M. X. J. (2004) Antibody responses to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in predators, scavengers, and hares in New Zealand during epidemics in sympatric rabbit populations. New Zealand veterinary journal, 52 2: 85-89. doi:10.1080/00480169.2004.36410


Author Parkes, J.
Heyward, R. P.
Henning, J.
Motha, M. X. J.
Title Antibody responses to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in predators, scavengers, and hares in New Zealand during epidemics in sympatric rabbit populations
Journal name New Zealand veterinary journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-0169
Publication date 2004-04-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00480169.2004.36410
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 52
Issue 2
Start page 85
End page 89
Total pages 5
Place of publication Wellington, N.Z.
Publisher New Zealand Veterinary Association
Language eng
Subject 070704 Veterinary Epidemiology
070712 Veterinary Virology
Abstract AIM: To test for antibodies to rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) virus (RHDV) in sera from mammals and birds associated with rabbit populations infected with RHDV. METHODS: Sera from feral and domestic cats, feral ferrets, stoats, hedgehogs, hares, harrier hawks, and black-backed gulls were taken (apart from some of the hares) from areas in New Zealand where RHD was active among rabbit populations. The presence of antibodies to RHD was investigated using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: Some individual animals of all species were seropositive. Thirty eight of 71 feral cats, but only 1/80 domestic cats were seropositive at a 1:40 dilution. The latter had not been exposed to RHDV. Also reactive in the ELISA were 2/8 stoats; 11/115 ferrets, with signifi cantly more females having antibodies than males; 4/73 hedgehogs; 2/18 hawks, and 1/30 gulls. Three of 66 hares, comprising 3/14 from one population, were seropositive. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from the hares, all these species are known to prey upon rabbits or scavenge their carcasses, a possible means of exposure to RHDV. The possibility that the positive test reactions were due to cross-reactions with other caliciviruses cannot be ruled out, especially for the hares. Nor could the study differentiate whether the positive results were due to an antigenic reaction to ingestion of RHDV, as suggested by overseas work, or to infection of new species by RHDV. These possibilities are being investigated further.
Keyword Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease
Predators
Scavengers
Serology
New Zealand
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 31 Mar 2009, 01:26:32 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Veterinary Science