Effect of cold water immersion after exercise in the heat on muscle function, body temperatures, and vessel diameter

Peiffer, J.J., Abbiss, C.R., Nosaka, K., Peake, J.M. and Laursen, P.B. (2009) Effect of cold water immersion after exercise in the heat on muscle function, body temperatures, and vessel diameter. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 1: 91-96. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2007.10.011


Author Peiffer, J.J.
Abbiss, C.R.
Nosaka, K.
Peake, J.M.
Laursen, P.B.
Title Effect of cold water immersion after exercise in the heat on muscle function, body temperatures, and vessel diameter
Journal name Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-2440
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2007.10.011
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Issue 1
Start page 91
End page 96
Total pages 6
Editor Kolt, G.
Place of publication Chatswood, NSW
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
110602 Exercise Physiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract Cold water immersion and active recovery are common post-exercise recovery treatments. A key assumption about the benefits of cold water immersion is that it reduces inflammation in skeletal muscle. However, no data are available from humans to support this notion. We compared the effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammatory and cellular stress responses in skeletal muscle from exercise-trained men 2, 24 and 48 h during recovery after acute resistance exercise. Exercise led to the infiltration of inflammatory cells, with increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins, and the subcellular translocation of heat shock proteins in muscle. These responses did not differ significantly between cold water immersion and active recovery. Our results suggest that cold water immersion is no more effective than active recovery for minimizing the inflammatory and stress responses in muscle after resistance exercise.
Formatted abstract
 Cold water immersion (CWI) is a popular recovery modality, but actual physiological responses to CWI after exercise in the heat have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of 20-min CWI (14°C) on neuromuscular function, rectal (T^sub re^) and skin temperature (T^sub sk^), and femoral venous diameter after exercise in the heat. Ten well-trained male cyclists completed two bouts of exercise consisting of 90-min cycling at a constant power output (216 ± 12 W) followed by a 16.1 km time trial (TT) in the heat (32 °C). Twenty-five minutes post-TT, participants were assigned to either CWI or control (CON) recovery conditions in a counterbalanced order. T^sub re^ and T^sub sk^ were recorded continuously, and maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque of the knee extensors (MVIC), MVIC with superimposed electrical stimulation (SMVIC), and femoral venous diameters were measured prior to exercise, 0, 45, and 90 min post-TT. T^sub re^ was significantly lower in CWI beginning 50 min post-TT compared with CON, and T^sub sk^ was significantly lower in CWI beginning 25 min post-TT compared with CON. Decreases in MVIC, and SMVIC torque after the TT were significantly greater for CWI compared with CON; differences persisted 90 min post-TT. Femoral vein diameter was approximately 9% smaller for CWI compared with CON at 45 min post-TT. These results suggest that CWI decreases T^sub re^, but has a negative effect on neuromuscular function. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
Keyword Blood flow
Fatigue
Recovery
Thermoregulation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article copyright date 2009, but not published online until 2008. Citation Journal of Science and Medicine (2009), 12(1, 91-96.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 36 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 44 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2009, 22:46:59 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences