Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study

Paterson, J., Percival, T., Schluter, Philip J., Sundborn, G., Abbott, M., Carter, S., Cowley-Malcolm, E., Borrows, J., Goa, W. and PIF Study Group (2008) Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 37 2: 273-279. doi:10.1093/ije/dym171


Author Paterson, J.
Percival, T.
Schluter, Philip J.
Sundborn, G.
Abbott, M.
Carter, S.
Cowley-Malcolm, E.
Borrows, J.
Goa, W.
PIF Study Group
Title Cohort Profile: The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study
Journal name International Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-5771
Publication date 2008-04-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dym171
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 37
Issue 2
Start page 273
End page 279
Total pages 7
Editor George Davey Smith
Shah Ebrahim
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
920210 Nursing
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
920305 Maori Health - Health Status and Outcomes
111713 Maori Health
Abstract In New Zealand, the Pacific population (those resident with a Pacific Islands heritage) is one of the fastest growing population subgroups and on census night, 7 March 2006, numbered 265 974 usual residents or 6.6% of the total population.1 Auckland is the preferred region of domicile.2 Samoans constitute the largest group (50%), followed by Cook Island Maori (23%), Tongan (18%), Niuean (9%), Fijian (3%), Tokelauan (3%) and Tuvalu Islanders (1%).2 This ethnic diversity is manifest in differing cultures, languages, and differential access to and utilization of education, health and social services. Pacific people are over-represented in many adverse health and social statistics2–4 leading to higher rates of communicable and non-communicable disease,2,4,5 hospitalization3,4,6 and death.2 Yet, prior to this study, there was relatively little culturally specific information on which to base efficacious coordinated public health interventions for this ethnic group.7 The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study, a birth cohort study, was developed through a process of collaboration with Pacific communities, researchers, and relevant health and social agencies to provide this much needed information. At inception, the PIF study had two directors, Dr Janis Paterson and Dr Colin Tukuitonga, a number of Pacific and non-Pacific investigators, and a team of Pacific field staff. An independent Pacific People's Advisory Board, composed of community representatives, was established to guide the directors and the management team in the scientific and cultural directions of the research. The Plunket Society (a not-for-profit society with clinical staff and volunteer network, and the largest provider of services to support the health and development of children under five8) also worked closely with the PIF research team. Grants were awarded from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) in 1998 and the Health Research Council (HRC) in 1999 to undertake a pilot study that enabled instruments, recruitment and interview procedures to be tested and refined. The main study commenced in 2000 and has been principally funded from FRST, with supplementary studies funded by multiple national and regional agencies. To date, the study has received approximately NZD$4.42 million in funding.
Formatted abstract
In New Zealand, the Pacific population (those resident with a Pacific Islands heritage) is one of the fastest growing population subgroups and on census night, 7 March 2006, numbered 265 974 usual residents or 6.6% of the total population.1 Auckland is the preferred region of domicile.2 Samoans constitute the largest group (50%), followed by Cook Island Maori (23%), Tongan (18%), Niuean (9%), Fijian (3%), Tokelauan (3%) and Tuvalu Islanders (1%).2 This ethnic diversity is manifest in differing cultures, languages, and differential access to and utilization of education, health and social services. Pacific people are over-represented in many adverse health and social statistics2–4 leading to higher rates of communicable and non-communicable disease,2,4,5 hospitalization3,4,6 and death.2 Yet, prior to this study, there was relatively little culturally specific information on which to base efficacious coordinated public health interventions for this ethnic group.7

The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study, a birth cohort study, was developed through a process of collaboration with Pacific communities, researchers, and relevant health and social agencies to provide this much needed information. At inception, the PIF study had two directors, Dr Janis Paterson and Dr Colin Tukuitonga, a number of Pacific and non-Pacific investigators, and a team of Pacific field staff. An independent Pacific People's Advisory Board, composed of community representatives, was established to guide the directors and the management team in the scientific and cultural directions of the research. The Plunket Society (a not-for-profit society with clinical staff and volunteer network, and the largest provider of services to support the health and development of children under five8) also worked closely with the PIF research team.

Grants were awarded from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) in 1998 and the Health Research Council (HRC) in 1999 to undertake a pilot study that enabled instruments, recruitment and interview procedures to be tested and refined. The main study commenced in 2000 and has been principally funded from FRST, with supplementary studies funded by multiple national and regional agencies. To date, the study has received approximately NZD$4.42 million in funding.

Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2009, 01:34:36 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work